Errant Wind (Viento errante)

Author:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Testimony by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Place & date:
« Finally, in the Chacabuco Concentration Camp, after three days aboard the "Policarpo Toro" (a war ship which had an uncertain destination since sailing from Valparaíso in December 1973; the question was not when and where we would dock, but how we would fall overboard), I felt that death had decided to take a step back and watch from me from a little further away. »
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Filistoque's Cueca (Cueca del Filistoque)

Author:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida (lyrics), Efraín Navarro (music)
Testimony by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida
Place & date:
« Filistoque is a real-life person in all his mighty height (1.90 metres tall). I always remember him laughing. In Chacabuco, we shared a house for nearly ten months. Around him, you were never allowed to become depressed or get into a stew over our situation. »
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For the Guy Who's Leaving

Author:
Alfredo Zitarrosa
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – April 1974
« Marcelo Concha Bascuñán, member of the Los de Chacabuco band, was a young man of great charisma and personal skills. He had been a swimming champion, and was an outstanding guitarist and singer. »
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From the Poplars I have Come, Mother (De los álamos vengo, madre)

Author:
Juan Vásquez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band created and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this traditional Spanish song at the Chacabuco concentration camp. »
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La Adelita

Author:
Unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January – February 1974
« This is another song that was performed by the band Los de Chacabuco and was sung in the prisoners’ weekly show. It’s a very old Mexican song that was popular in Chile. It used to be performed in the compound set up by the prisoners, and rehearsed at Los de Chacabuco's venue in the so-called Civic District. »
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Little Doctors (Doctorcitos)

Author:
Unknown. Folk tune from the Andes highlands
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« Agreeing to a suggestion from Ricardo, Los de Chacabuco learned and arranged this tune. In the Andean high plateau, the tune is a satirical reference to lawyers and, by implication, to civil servants. It is performed at carnival time. »
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Little Doctors (Doctorcitos)

Author:
Unknown. Folk tune from the Andes highlands
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« In 1974 - I don’t quite remember the month - the Chacabuco Olympics were held. The opening ceremony consisted of symbolically carrying the Olympic torch through the concentration camp. »
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Love Song (Canción de amor)

Author:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – December 1973
« Ángel Parra organised and directed the band Los de Chacabuco until his release from prison. Angel only conducted the group, and never sang or played an instrument. The exception was his farewell concert, which was the only time he sang at Chacabuco. »
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Lucky Devil (El suertúo)

Author:
Víctor Canto and Luis Cifuentes (lyrics), Roberto Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This cueca* was composed at Chacabuco some time between November 1973 and February 1974, and was sung by Los de Chacabuco, of which Víctor Canto and I were members. »
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Return, Return, Return (Volver, volver, volver)

Author:
Vicente Fernández
Testimony by:
Jorge Montealegre Iturra
« At the Chacabucan artistic shows, Hugo Peñaloza sang tangos, including “Volver” (Return) by Gardel and Le Pera. This caused a lot of self-ironic laughter when he sang  “que veinte años no es nada” (twenty years is nothing) given our situation of uncertainty in which no one knew how long we’d be imprisoned. »
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