454 results where found for «A mi palomita»


May the Omelette Flip Over (Que la tortilla se vuelva)

Author:
Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio. Ppopularized by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Claudio Melgarejo
Place & date:
« I spent a week in captivity, in November 1973. I didn’t hear many songs, but the most popular ones sung by my comrades were "Venceremos" (We shall be victorious) and “Que la tortilla se vuelva” (May the omelette flip over), also known as "The tomato song", which portrays the bosses' exploitation of the workers. At that time, the young in Latin American were steeped in revolutionary change and we empathised with the situation around Che Guevara and Cuba. »
[...]
« The lords of the mine »
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Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« This song was performed in the Stadium grandstands by a worker from the Madeco factory: Peineta Vasquez, winner of a Song Festival that was organised at grassroots level, during the times when we were allowed to leave the spaces under the grandstands, inside the stadium,  to sunbathe, together with women from various countries, before they got sent off to the pool area. »
[...]
« tired of dreaming, »
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Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Place & date:
« I’m from Chol Chol, part of the Coihue community. I was arrested along with twelve other people and they took us to the Second Police Station of Temuco. I was 30 years old. It was a week before I was due to get married. »
[...]
« tired of dreaming, »
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Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Marianella Ubilla
Place & date:
« I was taken prisoner on 23 November 1973, at the University of Concepción. In the Regional Stadium of Concepción we had to sing the National Anthem every day. They’d always play military marching music. I think they did that to show that they were the bosses. »
[...]
« tired of dreaming, »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Author:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This tonada song* recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. That afternoon of 11 September 1973, I was at school marking some music tests. After a while I heard a very loud bang on the door and went to open it at once. It was the police. »
[...]
« Pedro Humire Loredo »
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Morning Has Broken

Author:
Cat Stevens, based on a traditional Gaelic hymn; lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
« At the time of the coup in 1973, this song was world-famous and frequently played on the radio. As transistor radios were quite small, many people were arrested with one of these in their pockets, and a significant number were not searched and confiscated by the military. This explains why, when we were in the National Stadium, we were able to listen to them, keep track of the news and listen to music. »
[...]
« Mine is the sunlight, mine is the morning »
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Love (Amor)

Author:
Sergio Vesely (music); Guillermo Núñez (lyrics)
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song is based on a poem Guillermo wrote in the Puchuncaví Prison Camp dedicated to his partner Soledad. Of all the songs I composed as a prisoner, this is the only one where the lyrics are not mine. The reason is very human and simple. One day Guillermo asked me if I could set to music verses he had written so he could sing them to his beloved the next time she visited him. I found the idea so original and I liked it so much that I decided to help him. I took the sheet of paper with the poem to my cell in one of the adjacent huts. After reading and re-reading it several times, I began to compose this song. It’s a shame, but I don’t recall if Soledad ever got a chance to hear it. »
[...]
« What smile, what song »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Author:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Place & date:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« in the midst of abysses, pain and sweat »
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Three Mountaineers (Eran tres alpinos)

Author:
Unknown. Traditional Spanish children's song
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Place & date:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We adapted this song and produced a play based on it. Each of us played one of the characters. We spent a lot of time on this. We performed the play to the other women prisoners in both centres within the prison: Regina Coellys and Alborada. Alborada was a section of Buen Pastor but it was not part of the prison facility. Alborada housed women political prisoners too. »
[...]
« Three mountaineers were coming home from war, »
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The Black King (El rey negro)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« One cold winter night of 1975, the small clinic of Melinka, in the Puchuncaví Detention Camp, became the setting for a touching story. »
[...]
« no one could dominate them, »
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