153 results where found for «After the War»


The Rain is Falling (Scende la pioggia)

Song by:
The Turtles, with new lyrics by Gianni Morandi
Testimony by:
Eduardo René Cuevas
Experience in:
Cárcel de Los Ángeles, September 1973
« This song was a workhorse for the prisoners. Iván Moscoso sang it, accompanied by a guitar, in a powerful and defiant voice, and the most altruistic among us sung along in the presence of the gendarme guards, in a courtyard that was only for political prisoners. »
[...]
« For me, a prisoner from (the city of) Laja who walked with a cane, it represented a glimmer of hope and being able to say I am still alive, after twice being threatened with death on the very day of the coup (11 September 1973). Every minute, every day represented a victory of one more day over death and the desire to cling to life. This is part of what thousands of comrades had to live through in different circumstances of their lives. »
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Chacabuco Mass (Misa chacabucana)

Song by:
Ángel Parra and Ariel Ramírez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This song is the second track on the cassette recorded in the Chacabuco prison camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, formed by Ángel Parra and led by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had already been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group's conductor. »
[...]
« The Chacabuco Mass consists of eight songs: four by Ángel Parra, composed in the camp, and four by Ariel Ramírez from his Misa Criolla (Creole Mass) recorded by Los Fronterizos* in the 1960s: 'After plowing the earth' (Ángel Parra), 'Kyrie' (Ariel Ramírez), 'Gloria' (Ariel Ramírez), 'Sanctus' (Ariel Ramírez), 'Exclamation' (Ángel Parra), 'Agnus Dei' (Ariel Ramírez), 'Man of clay' (Ángel Parra) and 'Ave Maria' (Ángel Parra). »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
« We were in Pavilion 1. One of us came up with the idea, I can’t remember who. There were so many of us and we spent the day inventing and creating things! »
[...]
« Bless be sign language, a thousand times blessed! Almost all of us knew it and we could exchange names, messages, information, facts,… All this while others would kicked the ball - the poor thing had done nothing wrong – and screamed, so that the cops who were looking after us would laugh and continue watching the game. They never noticed anything. »
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Friend (Amiga)

Song by:
Miguel Bosé
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« When they arrested me I was 19 years old. I was one of the youngest political prisoners at the time in Arica. »
[...]
« After many years we met and spoke about the song. He was laughing. I was nice to thank him after so many years. »
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Everything Changes (Todo cambia)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My guitar accompanied me for the entire time that I was deprived of freedom. It was like a magnet. In the afternoon we would sing and play in the courtyard. »
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Little Doctors (Doctorcitos)

Song by:
Unknown. Folk tune from the Andes highlands
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« In 1974 - I don’t quite remember the month - the Chacabuco Olympics were held. The opening ceremony consisted of symbolically carrying the Olympic torch through the concentration camp. »
[...]
« There was a tremendous uproar, and the march left from the corner of our house at number 26, pavilion 5, next to our University, in the middle of the Civic District. The fervour grew as we were all running next to El Tigre and reached another pavilion after a few laps around the Olympic course. »
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We Shall Overcome

Song by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Héctor Salgado
Experience in:
« I would like to add, to the testimony of Alfonso Padilla, a picture of the musical group that performed the Joan Baez song, 'We Shall Overcome'. This group was formed and led by Alfonso Padilla during his time in prison. »
[...]
« In the picture, I was 17 years old and I am third from left to right. The picture of the musical group was taken after Padilla was exiled to Finland. »
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Cantata Santa María de Iquique

Song by:
Luis Advis
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla
« Between March 1974 and July 1975, I had the opportunity to arrange about 200 songs and direct the production of the Cantata de Santa María de Iquique. In truth, the prison was my conservatoire. That’s where I learnt the basics of the profession of musician. »
[...]
« The process of producing the Cantata Santa María de Iquique lasted little over two months, between the beginning of March and the second fortnight of May 1975. After writing down the lyrics from the record in a couple of days, I listened to the music for a month very carefully. Since I didn’t know how to read or write music, I annotated it with the note and chord names that accompanied the melody. »
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Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Song by:
Unknown. Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on "Makhnovtchina", attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Experience in:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. Our comrade and beloved friend Sergio Pérez Molina, leader of the MIR who had fallen into the hands of the DINA a few days earlier, was being tortured again. We had already seen him disfigured by the blows; they had even applied electricity to a bullet wound when they shot him at the time of his arrest. Moren Brito boasted that he had run a pick-up truck over Sergio’s body. »
[...]
« López-Stewart, M Cristina »
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Song of a Middle-Class Man (Canción de un hombre medio)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« In our political discussions, we always spoke disdainfully of the middle class. In the view of the Marxist ideologues in prison, that sector of society supported the dictatorship and it was necessary to reverse that trend. It was not an active support but rather a passive support that involved laying low and getting by with the dictatorship. »
[...]
« and there was no war here, what a disaster. »
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