147 results where found for «After the War»


National Anthem of Chile

Author:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« The Puchuncaví Prisoners Camp had a daily routine similar to that of military regiments. In a ridiculous ceremony, the flag was raised every morning at dawn and then it was taken down at nightfall. »
[...]
« that the Lord gave you for bulwark »
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The Vargas War (La guerra de los Vargas)

Author:
Unknown. Lyrics modifed by political prisoners.
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This old Venezuelan song, written by an unknown songwriter, and that has had many variations, was performed by Los de Chacabuco in during the camp’s weekly show. »
[...]
« The clan war of the Vargas family »
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I Come Back (Vuelvo)

Author:
Patricio Manns (lyrics) and Horacio Salinas (music)
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Place & date:
« During our mate-drinking gatherings in the Prison of Santiago, we always talked about the song ‘Vuelvo’. It gave you the hope of returning to the fight. The prison was only something temporary. »
[...]
« The vocation of his war »
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We Shall Overcome

Author:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« With the group we formed towards the end of 1974, we decided to perform in one of the two visitors’ courtyards at Concepción Prison that Christmas. We built a stage, we set up a PA system and the Caracol Theatre Group came to perform a short play. »
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Filistoque's Cueca (Cueca del Filistoque)

Author:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida (lyrics), Efraín Navarro (music)
Testimony by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida
Place & date:
« Filistoque is a real-life person in all his mighty height (1.90 metres tall). I always remember him laughing. In Chacabuco, we shared a house for nearly ten months. Around him, you were never allowed to become depressed or get into a stew over our situation. »
[...]
« He radiated happiness and optimism. And even though he was aware that the issue would continue to trouble us, he never stopped talking about the commissions and prosecutors who would be processing our cases. He projected this optimism even beyond the prison camp fences. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Author:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Place & date:
« Preparations for that Wednesday night became more intense. It would be a different night. We women prisoners had secretly organised ourselves, but more importantly, we had also coordinated with the male prisoners. I’m not sure whether it was our idea or whether the men had proposed it. That detail is irrelevant now. »
[...]
« In that spirit, we feverishly took the tables out into the middle of the prison yard and placed the benches together. Amidst all the preparations, midnight was upon us. Five minutes to midnight, in silence and in the dark, we climbed up onto the benches and the tables, as quiet as we could but smiling. That warm night, the director counted to four and then, all of a sudden, we burst into song in unison. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Author:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Place & date:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
[...]
« Before finishing I want to tell you about an example from Paris on the subject of memory. When Pinochet was arrested in London in 1998, I had been intensively working in Paris for several years with a team of fellow former political prisoners, collecting hundreds of testimonies for use in the judicial processes in London and Madrid. At that point we became aware that many people had never talked about what they had lived through, not even to their family, or wife, or children. »
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Oh Saving Victim (O salutaris Hostia)

Author:
text by Saint Thomas Aquinas; music by Lorenzo Perosi
Testimony by:
Roberto Navarrete
Place & date:
Cárcel de Santiago, November 1973 - April 1974
« The political prisoners’ cell block in Santiago Prison was established when they transferred many people from the National Stadium in October or November 1973. I was first held in the Stadium. I was 18 when they arrested me. »
[...]
« The prison warden in charge of us (non-commissioned officer Chandía) harangued us and said to us that "the political prisoners were very malevolent". Among ourselves we called the officer “the malevolent one". Then to show him that we were being serious we would sing "O salutaris Hostia". I imagine it must have made quite an impression on him given that he had been used to dealing with common prisoners. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Author:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
Eliseo González
Place & date:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« Jorge Peña Hen was in solitary confinement that day. I don’t know how, but someone brought him matches. With his saliva, he made ink from the phosphorus tips, which he then used to write a score of music on a scrap of paper. »
[...]
« In corridor two (known as “the cancer ward” because that’s where all of us who had been tortured were held) we did not listen to music. »
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You Will Pay (The Cigarette Smoke) (Pagarás [El humo del cigarrillo])

Author:
Manuel Mantilla
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Place & date:
« The political prisoners were isolated but when they made us go down to the courtyard, we were with the common prisoners. They listened to the song ‘El humo del cigarillo’ on the radio. That is the first song I remember from the period during which I was imprisoned. »
[...]
« A political prisoner can be isolated for days on end. A common prisoner gets bored, strangles themselves. But not us: we have singing, strength, struggle. That carries us forward and distinguishes us from common prisoners. »
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