405 results where found for «An Old Love Tune»


Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Song by:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Experience in:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia, my sister Alejandra and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« We thought, thought, and thought, and suddenly it came to us. Neither Ale nor I could sing, but we thought it would be a lovely gift to sing 'Let's Break the Morning' for him. »
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Mid-Afternoon Love (Amor de media tarde)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« This song is dedicated to Graciela Navarro, who managed to make my prisoner's life more beautiful on the days we were allowed to receive visitors. »
[...]
« During the week, when the hourly monotony became unbearable, she would use her free moments to deliver roses and brief love letters for me at the prison gate. »
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Love (Amor)

Song by:
Guillermo Núñez (lyrics) and Sergio Vesely (music)
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song is based on a poem Guillermo wrote in the Puchuncaví Prison Camp dedicated to his partner Soledad. Of all the songs I composed as a prisoner, this is the only one where the lyrics are not mine. »
[...]
« The reason is very human and simple. One day Guillermo asked me if I could set to music verses he had written so he could sing them to his beloved the next time she visited him. »
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A finger-picked Cueca from a solidary companion (Cueca punteada de un solidario)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« It is true that the hard experience of torture and prison unified us and at times even generated strong ties of friendship among the prisoners. »
[...]
« I wrote this song while at Camp Melinka, thinking openly about our flaws. Thinking about the double standards that ruled our daily behaviour: talking about love on one hand and feeding hatred on the other. Thinking about how far we were from living what we preached every day: to live together in equality, in peace, in brotherhood and in solidarity with everyone. »
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Song of the Seed and the Plant (Canción de la semilla y la planta)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« The history of the seed and the plant, of which this song forms part, was performed as a play to entertain our audience of children during a family visit to the prison. Imagination had no limits when it came to kindling a small flame of hope in our hearts. »
[...]
« With the scarce resources available to us, we made costumes and dressed up as a jester, a gardener, a sun, and clowns, and thus attired we came out to meet our loved ones that day, much to the surprise of the soldiers, who watched us from a distance not understanding what was going on. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. »
[...]
« It was a fairly well-known popular song with lyrics that go 'Yo me pondré a vivir en cada rosa…' (I will live in every rose...), do you know it? It was the song that Cecilia and Flavio had fallen in love listening to. »
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The Wall (La muralla)

Song by:
Nicolás Guillén (lyrics) and Quilapayún (music)
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
« In prison, there was a guy who played the guitar. He cheered up the afternoons in the cell. We all sang with him. »
[...]
« When I listen to 'La Muralla' ('The Wall'), I remember an old Spaniard who was a prisoner with us. He was 70-something years old. Because there were no showers, he would wash with cold water in the sink, and he would say 'I want to die in prison so the stigma of my death falls upon these dogs'. That was the beginning of a campaign that the prisoners ran to have a shower cabin installed. »
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Barlovento

Song by:
Eduardo Serrano
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« This is one of the songs the band Los de Chacabuco arranged and performed at the weekly show authorised by the military. »
[...]
« The song “Barlovento”, as was the case with all the group’s arrangements, was rehearsed in an improvised venue (an old miners’ house) that the musicians had adapted for that purpose in the Civic District, on a street near the camp entrance. »
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The Little Fence (La rejita)

Song by:
lyrics: collective creation; music: 'Jálame la pitita' by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We always sang this song when we were taken to Regimiento Arica. That was a torture centre. »
[...]
« We had a kind of implicit code that prohibited us from crying or getting depressed during the day. At night, in our cells, we’d cry, but not during the day as there was always an older woman looking over you. We called the older women 'mum'. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Song by:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
Eliseo González
Experience in:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« Jorge Peña Hen(1) was in solitary confinement that day. I don’t know how, but someone brought him matches. With his saliva, he made ink from the phosphorus tips, which he then used to write a score of music on a scrap of paper. »
[...]
« Keep in mind that the prisoners included farmworkers, miners and intellectuals. So if you put on classical music for an old guy from the hills, he would say 'What’s that?' Or, if you played corridos(2) for the intellectuals or pseudo-intellectuals, they might not like it much. »
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