209 results where found for «Answer Me»


Anthem of Puchuncaví (Himno de Puchuncaví)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« A few weeks before being transferred to Valparaíso Jail - where I would face a war council on account of alleged violations of the State Interior Security Law and other military regulations that existed during the state of siege - I wrote a song that I called anthem, because I wanted it to be sung as a group at the end of our cultural events on Fridays. The song was written so that every prisoner, regardless of political affiliation, could sing it. The only way to strengthen prisoners’ unity was to realise that all of us lived in the same conditions. »
[...]
« they come from everywhere. »
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Musicalized Dialogue between Two Old Prisoners (Diálogo musicalizado entre dos ancianos presos)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« At Puchuncaví Detention Camp (Melinka) I shared a cell with an elderly man from Lota, where he had spent his entire life working in the coal mines. I was struck by the way he spoke. It was very different from the “Chilean” way of a twenty-something year-old from the capital like me. When he talked to our fellow prisoners, I could barely understand a word he said. I composed this song in the cell by transcribing some of our conversations. »
[...]
« What’s the matter? I’ve been behind bars a long time, »
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La López Pereyra

Song by:
Artidorio Cresseri
Testimony by:
Germán Larrabe
« This Argentine zamba* was the first song we tried to perform in Puchuncaví, with a group made up of prisoners transferred from Chacabuco Detention Camp together with us, newly arrived 'Puchuncas'. »
[...]
« your image haunts me, yours is my life and my love too, »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Experience in:
« One of the most important songs in the detention centres. Impossible to count how many times we sang it. Every time someone was released from a detention camp or there was credible information that a person would be sent into exile, a gigantic chorus would sing this song, in a powerful unison. No one could possibly forget it. Especially significant at Tres Álamos, as this was the “exit” camp. »
[...]
« Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios. »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
José Selín Carrasco Vargas
« While we were imprisoned in Melinka, this song was sung every time that one of us was released. I remember a fellow prisoner nicknamed Bigote Molina (Moustache Molina) singing the song when we were going to Tres Álamos, from where we would be released a few days later. »
[...]
« Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios. »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Song by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This tonada song* recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. That afternoon of 11 September 1973, I was at school marking some music tests. After a while I heard a very loud bang on the door and went to open it at once. It was the police. »
[...]
« Bring me your acacias »
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Love (Amor)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely (music); Guillermo Núñez (lyrics)
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song is based on a poem Guillermo wrote in the Puchuncaví Prison Camp dedicated to his partner Soledad. Of all the songs I composed as a prisoner, this is the only one where the lyrics are not mine. The reason is very human and simple. One day Guillermo asked me if I could set to music verses he had written so he could sing them to his beloved the next time she visited him. I found the idea so original and I liked it so much that I decided to help him. I took the sheet of paper with the poem to my cell in one of the adjacent huts. After reading and re-reading it several times, I began to compose this song. It’s a shame, but I don’t recall if Soledad ever got a chance to hear it. »
[...]
« If you leave every afternoon without me, »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Song by:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Experience in:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« you are left with memories, pale smile »
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I’m Not from Here - To my Comrade, my Love (No soy de aquí - A mi compañera)

Song by:
Facundo Cabral, with lyrics modified by a political prisoner
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« The choir of male prisoners sang a piece called “A mi compañera” (To my comrade, my love) to the music of “No soy de aquí, ni soy de allá” (I'm not from here, nor from there) by Facundo Cabral. I don’t remember who wrote the lyrics. But that’s how I wrote it down in one of the ten notebooks I used to copy songs during my imprisonment. »
[...]
« I like you when you come to our Stadium »
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We Shall Overcome

Song by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« We shall overcome someday; »
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