353 results where found for «Calle Ir������������������n N������������������ 3037 / Venda Sexy / La Discotheque»


The Crux of the Matter (La madre del cordero)

Music piece by:
Tito Fernández
Testimony by:
Servando Becerra Poblete
Detention in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, 9 November 1973 - 10 November 1974
« I recited this poem in the National Stadium. I continued to do so in the Chacabuco prison camp, earning the nickname of “Venancio” from my fellow prisoners. »
[...]
« when I heard my name called »
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Free (Libre)

Music piece by:
José Luis Armenteros and Pablo Herrero, popularised by Nino Bravo.
Testimony by:
anonymous
Detention in:
« While waiting in the grandstands to be interrogated for the first, second or more times, we would sing 'Free' to those who were being lined up to be released. 'Free' was a catharsis, a mixture of joy for those who were going and hope for those of us left behind. Unfortunately, the dictatorship and its civil and military henchmen employed the song for their own propaganda. »
[...]
« the voice that called him »
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Free (Libre)

Music piece by:
José Luis Armenteros and Pablo Herrero, popularised by Nino Bravo.
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« This song was performed in the Stadium grandstands by a worker from the Madeco factory: Peineta Vasquez, winner of a Song Festival that was organised at grassroots level, during the times when we were allowed to leave the spaces under the grandstands, inside the stadium,  to sunbathe, together with women from various countries, before they got sent off to the pool area. »
[...]
« the voice that called him »
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Free (Libre)

Music piece by:
José Luis Armenteros and Pablo Herrero, popularised by Nino Bravo.
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Detention in:
« I’m from Chol Chol, part of the Coihue community. I was arrested along with 12 other people and they took us to the Second Police Station of Temuco. »
[...]
« the voice that called him »
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Free (Libre)

Music piece by:
José Luis Armenteros and Pablo Herrero, popularised by Nino Bravo.
Testimony by:
Marianella Ubilla
Detention in:
« I was taken prisoner on 23 November 1973, at the University of Concepción. In the Regional Stadium of Concepción, we had to sing the National Anthem every day. »
[...]
« the voice that called him »
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Lili Marlene

Music piece by:
Hans Leip
Testimony by:
Rogelio Felipe Castillo Acevedo
« We were forced to belt out these marching songs. »
[...]
« Soon the sentry called out »
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Lili Marlene

Music piece by:
Hans Leip
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
Detention in:
« During the daily flag-lowering ritual in the camp Melinka, the prisoners first had to get into formation in the courtyard and then walk in line to the location of the mast. »
[...]
« Soon the sentry called out, »
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Run Run Went up North (Run Run se fue pa'l norte)

Music piece by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Ernesto Parra Navarrete
Detention in:
« Run Run... On the big pitch, mild summer weather was in the air. »
[...]
« We would listen attentively for our names to be called out, in order to go and receive some personal item sent by our families, something to accompany us on our new journey into the unknown. »
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Lucky Devil (El suertúo)

Music piece by:
Víctor Canto and Luis Cifuentes (lyrics), Roberto Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Detention in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This cueca was composed at Chacabuco sometime between November 1973 and February 1974 and was sung by Los de Chacabuco, of which Víctor Canto and I were members. »
[...]
« This song was written very quickly and was ready in less than a day. I don’t remember exactly where we were when we composed it, but it may have been the house I shared with other comrades or the house where the group rehearsed - located in what we called 'the civic district' - or seated at the group tables where we ate. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Music piece by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Detention in:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
[...]
« I still remember those intense moments when we sang so many songs. Gazing up at the sky, we sang 'Candombe para José', which we called 'El Negro José'. I understood that song as something new and different from the songs we usually sang. It seemed more contemporary to me and it made me feel in touch with my people outside the camp. The line 'en un pueblo olvidado no sé por qué' ('in a God-forsaken town, I don't know why') seemed connected with how I was feeling at that time. »
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