439 results where found for «Calle Irán Nº 3037 / Venda Sexy / La Discotheque»


Today I Sing for the Sake of Singing (Hoy canto por cantar)

Author:
Nydia Caro and Riccardo Cerratto
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Place & date:
« I have never been a great music listener. Nevertheless, before the coup I used to listen to Nueva Canción, especially Quilapayún and Rolando Alarcón. I also liked cumbias, to fool around. We would dance and have fun. On the other hand, and this is more due to my family, I have always liked classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky. It stirs important things in me. It moves me. »
[...]
« Calle Irán Nº 3037 / Venda Sexy / La Discotheque »
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The Clock (El reloj)

Author:
Roberto Cantoral
Testimony by:
Ana María Arenas
« The day I was captured, after the first torture session, I asked for permission to sing a Christmas carol, the name of which I cannot remember. I did it to let one of my captive friends know that I was also at the Venda Sexy. »
[...]
« Calle Irán Nº 3037 / Venda Sexy / La Discotheque »
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Recinto: Calle Irán Nº 3037 / Venda Sexy / La Discotheque
There are 2 testimonies in this detention centre.
If you had a musical experience in this detention centre, please share it here!

Recinto: Recinto CNI calle Pedro de Valdivia Nº 710 / Cuartel Bahamondes / Casa de la Música / Casa de la Risa
There are no testimonies in this detention centre.
If you had a musical experience in this detention centre, please share it here!

Recinto: Recinto CNI calle Colo Colo 2001 / Casa de Piedra, La Serena
There are no testimonies in this detention centre.
If you had a musical experience in this detention centre, please share it here!

I’m Not from Here - To my Comrade, my Love (No soy de aquí - A mi compañera)

Author:
Facundo Cabral, with lyrics modified by a political prisoner
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Place & date:
« The choir of male prisoners sang a piece called “A mi compañera” (To my comrade, my love) to the music of “No soy de aquí, ni soy de allá” (I'm not from here, nor from there) by Facundo Cabral. I don’t remember who wrote the lyrics. But that’s how I wrote it down in one of the ten notebooks I used to copy songs during my imprisonment. »
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Captive Quena (Quena cautiva)

Author:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, September - December 1975
« I first laid my hands on a quena (Andean flute) when I was nine years old. It was resplendently fragile and lyrical. My passion for this instrument was immediate, or rather, the quena chose me. Five years later, aged 14, I had already become the quena player of a quartet in ​​San Antonio. »
[...]
« There were four pavillions In the Tres Álamos concentration camp in Santiago: "Pavilion A", "Pavilion B", the "Women’s Pavilion" and the section called "Cuatro Álamos". »
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The Little Fence (La rejita)

Author:
lyrics: collective creation; music: “Jálame la pitita” by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Place & date:
« Let’s get going, would say “the lizards”, as we called the policemen because they dress all in green. I looked and looked so I wouldn’t forget anything, because I didn’t know how many years I would be locked up for. I was emotional too: one gets frightened. Against the traffic, they turn the wheel. »
[...]
« The political prisoners would sing “La Golondrina” in two voices. Valentina Gálvez would sing the solo and we would produce a kind of murmur. We entertained ourselves with this. For Christmas the nuns sent us an omelette and we sent a brick in return. You had to make a speech and sing. I sang “Alfonsina y el mar”. Just then, the representative of the International Red Cross arrived. He was blond, blue-eyed and well tanned. I had seen on him on the television when he visited Pisagua. In Buen Pastor there was a place we called “the pigsty” because the prisoners were all dirty, in their nighties or petticoats. They were all crying inconsolably. »
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Amalia Rosa

Author:
Tino Carrasco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band founded and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this Venezuelan folk song, known as joropo*, singing it at the weekly prison camp show. I dare say it was one of the favourite songs of the audience, comprised of political prisoners. »
[...]
« This song can be found in Alberto Corvalán’s clandestine recording of the farewell show for Angel. On the recording it is called "Canción de Venezuela". »
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Words for Julia (Palabras para Julia)

Author:
José Agustín Goytisolo (lyrics) and Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, 1975 and 1976 until Tres Álamos was closed on 28 November 1976
« There were so many of us women prisoners. Despite the circumstances we had managed to invent our own world, one with our rules, according to what we thought and wanted for ourselves, our families and all the Chilean people. One might think we were ambitious women, and yes, we certainly were. Most of us remain so, and surely will continue to be until the end. »
[...]
« One idea after another, one experience after another, and with so much enthusiasm, we created a way to sustain ourselves without depending on anyone else. The situation outside the prison was variable, from good to more or less, from more or less to bad, from bad to worse, and also from really good to bad. Conversely, in those sad years it was all very difficult unless you belonged to the other side. And that was how the workshop in which all of us took part was created and grew, and which with much imagination we called the “Labour Workshop”. »
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