167 results where found for «Casida of the Dark Pigeons»


Coplas of El Yopo (Coplas de El Yopo)

Author:
Unknown. Traditional Venezuelan song. Popularised in Chile by Isabel and Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Place & date:
« A comrade whose last name was Saavedra (if I recall correctly) sung this song passionately. This song earned him the nickname of ‘El Yopo’ (also ‘chopo’), as is usual in popular culture. The tune was well-known in Chile, as sung by Ángel and Isabel Parra, who called it "Décimas del folklore venezolano" or "Coplas Venezolanas". It was one of the most popular songs in prison and was performed at many of our musical events. It was also sung at Ritoque and Puchuncaví. »
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The Wall (La muralla)

Author:
Nicolás Guillén (lyrics) and Quilapayún (music)
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
« In prison, there was a guy who played the guitar. He cheered up the afternoons in the cell. We all sang with him. »
[...]
« We sang a lot of songs from the Spanish Civil War, for example “Dime dónde vas morena”, the Mexican song “Carabina 3030” and the Argentinian song “Balderrama”. We sang them when we already knew that they would not kill us, after a visit from a delegation of the United Nations. »
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Luchín

Author:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« They said that once you got to the prison of Teja Island, you were safe. However, once when we were in our cells, they shot several young people who were between 18 and 21 years old. When I saw their pictures I asked myself why I hadn’t been among them. »
[...]
« After two days, a guitar appeared. It must have been some cool guard who let it in. The owner of the guitar was an academic who knew songs by Victor Jara, Quilapayún and Inti-Illimani. They were popular at that time and we identified with them. Their songs represented the people and the peasants. »
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Sinner, come to sweet Jesus (Pecador, ven al dulce Jesús)

Author:
Unknown
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« One time a group of male and female evangelicals came to Teja Island to preach. They were taken to the visitors’ yard. Because we prisoners had nothing else to do, we went to see them. »
[...]
« Something very funny happened that stayed with me for the rest of my life. After the music finished one of the evangelicals asked: “who wants to receive Jesus Christ as their saviour?” One prisoner replied: “but what if they put us in prison again?” We all burst out laughing. You had to find a way to let off steam. »
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Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Author:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Place & date:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia Ovando, my sister Alejandra Ruiz and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« When visits were allowed to the detention centres, we would jump into the car and begin to sing 'El Pueblo Unido' (The people united), 'Venceremos' (We shall be victorious), 'El Tomate' (The tomato), 'The Internationale' and many other songs. We would sing right up until reaching the entrance of the place where the prisoners were held. The place I most remember is the Cochrane Navy barracks located by the Los Ciervos river. »
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Far Away (Tamo daleko)

Author:
Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916.
Testimony by:
Jorge Grez Leuquén
« Working as a documentary film-maker for some years, I recorded the stories of some of the prisoners during the dictatorship. It was during some of these sessions that the song 'Tamo Daleko' reappeared; it had been sung numerous times on Dawson Island. This is a humble contribution from the south of the south. »
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You Can Blame Me (Échame a mí la culpa)

Author:
José Ángel Espinoza, aka Ferrusquillo
Testimony by:
Marcia Scantlebury
« Mexican songs - and this one in particular - have always moved me. When I shared a cell with Miriam Silva, a young woman who belonged to the Communist Youth, arrested by the DINA when she was handing out leaflets on the street, we killed time in an organised fashion to keep ourselves from getting depressed and overcome by anxiety due to an unknown fate. »
[...]
« Since Miriam also liked music, one of the activities we planned was to spend the afternoons singing. On a piece of toilet paper I copied down the words to the song "Échame a mí la culpa", so she could learn it and then we could sing it together. »
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To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Gabriela Durand
« I was 18, and already I had been tortured on the rack several times. One day I was with some other comrade prisoners, and as sometimes happened, the guards put some music on. They used to put the radio on, playing popular tunes of the time. For us young people, the songs were a bit corny, but still we enjoyed them; they were a relief. We always kept absolute silence. »
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They Say the Homeland Is - Soldier's Song

Author:
Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio
Testimony by:
Sergio Reyes Soto
Place & date:
« This song, like so many others, was not at all “captive”. The revolutionary songs we sang behind bars imbued us with a sense of freedom. Rolando Alarcón, and later Quilapayún, introduced “Dicen que la patria es” (or “Canción de soldados”) to Chile. »
[...]
« I sang this song often because it accurately described our situation. The words plead to soldiers not to fire against their own people. Rarely did this occur in Chile, but we shared our prisoners’ barracks, called Remo, with three members of the Air Force. »
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Future (Futuro)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« The dream of the political prisoner was to regain freedom. All of us would feel joy when one of us was about to be released from prison, although it far from easy to see a comrade depart. Even less so for those who suspected they would never enjoy that privilege. »
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