167 results where found for «Casida of the Dark Pigeons»


Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Author:
Unknown. Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on "Makhnovtchina", attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Place & date:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. Our comrade and beloved friend Sergio Pérez Molina, leader of the MIR who had fallen into the hands of the DINA a few days earlier, was being tortured again. We had already seen him disfigured by the blows; they had even applied electricity to a bullet wound when they shot him at the time of his arrest. Moren Brito boasted that he had run a pick-up truck over Sergio’s body. »
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How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos)

Author:
Unknown. Popularised by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
« During the 1960s the band Quilapayún popularised this old Spanish song in Chile. Víctor Canto and I performed it as a duet in Santiago’s National Stadium - which had been converted into a concentration, torture and extermination camp - from September to November 1973. Whenever the military allowed us to do so, we would sing it in the locker rooms where we slept, and in the grandstands where we spent much of the day. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Author:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Luis Madariaga
Place & date:
« In prison we would sing this when a comrade was released or sent to exile. It was a powerful source of strength, solidarity and ironclad brotherhood, created during those long months in captivity, seeking an outlet for our hearts. I believe that that experience left a mark on all of us. »
[...]
« During my time at Valparaíso Prison, I had the chance to see the singer Julio Iglesias come to the facility. He said something stupid: “I am a prisoner too; I practically live on an aeroplane.” The reaction of the political prisoners watching from the third gallery of that hellish prison was total silence. The word had spread asking that no one should applaud whatever Iglesias had to say. This led Iglesias to later ask the man who had brought him to this place who those guys were up on the Prison’s third gallery, who never once applauded him and kept quiet. This had been quite noticeable because there were many of us up there surrounding the gallery's handrails. It was our way of expressing our disapproval for this man who was on good terms with Chile’s criminal dictatorship. Then Iglesias left. »
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To Sing by Improvising (Pa’ cantar de un improviso)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
« We made a Venezuelan cuatro from a large plank of wood attached to one of the walls of the "ranch" where we ate. »
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Captive Quena (Quena cautiva)

Author:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, September - December 1975
« I first laid my hands on a quena (Andean flute) when I was nine years old. It was resplendently fragile and lyrical. My passion for this instrument was immediate, or rather, the quena chose me. Five years later, aged 14, I had already become the quena player of a quartet in ​​San Antonio. »
[...]
« When I was 16 years old, the Chilean Armed Forces, violating the Constitution, took possession of the country, and with it, the music and instruments – particularly that which had been symbolic of the Salvador Allende presidency. Panpipes, charangos and quenas went from being from the "sonorous trinity" into the void of oblivion, prohibited for being subversive. »
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After the War (Después de la guerra)

Author:
Sandro
Testimony by:
Nelly Andrade Alcaino
« The military officials in charge of the Tejas Verdes camp made us sing, and they gave us just one day to select the songs and rehearse. »
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South-Eastern Storm (La Sudestada)

Author:
unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Place & date:
« While I was in solitary confinement in Cuatro Álamos, one day I noticed there was a large room at the end of the corridor, which, overnight, the "dinos" (members of the DINA secret police) had filled with prisoners. At the end of the day, these comrades organised quite a "jamboree": talking, sharing information, asking questions and singing. It was a frenetic activity of solidarity, support, courage and warmth. »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Author:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Place & date:
« One of the most important songs in the detention centres. Impossible to count how many times we sang it. Every time someone was released from a detention camp or there was credible information that a person would be sent into exile, a gigantic chorus would sing this song, in a powerful unison. No one could possibly forget it. Especially significant at Tres Álamos, as this was the “exit” camp. »
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For the Guy Who's Leaving

Author:
Alfredo Zitarrosa
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – April 1974
« Marcelo Concha Bascuñán, member of the Los de Chacabuco band, was a young man of great charisma and personal skills. He had been a swimming champion, and was an outstanding guitarist and singer. »
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Today I Sing for the Sake of Singing (Hoy canto por cantar)

Author:
Nydia Caro and Riccardo Cerratto
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Place & date:
« I have never been a great music listener. Nevertheless, before the coup I used to listen to Nueva Canción, especially Quilapayún and Rolando Alarcón. I also liked cumbias, to fool around. We would dance and have fun. On the other hand, and this is more due to my family, I have always liked classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky. It stirs important things in me. It moves me. »
[...]
« The music had the purpose of covering the screams and the hubbub. Anyone in the vicinity would have taken notice of this music playing all day. Because we also have to remember that the culture of the time was quite respectful of neighbours: no one would think of blasting out music. Nowadays this does happen. I think that it DINA's legacy to society and to its successors. It’s a paradox, because you would make a horrible noise during the day but perhaps you were giving signals of something different to what our culture was at the time in our country. »
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