29 results where found for «Creole Mass – Gloria (Misa criolla - Gloria)»


Creole Mass – Gloria (Misa criolla - Gloria)

Song by:
Ariel Ramírez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – December 1973
« As far as I remember (and there may be other versions) the "Los de Chacabuco" band was founded by Ángel Parra in response to a request by the Army chaplain Varela, who asked for assistance for the Mass he celebrated for both prisoners and soldiers. Our first musical presentation was the Creole Mass by Ariel Ramírez. »
[...]
« Creole Mass – Gloria (Misa criolla - Gloria) »
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Chacabuco Mass (Misa chacabucana)

Song by:
Ángel Parra and Ariel Ramírez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This song is the second track on the cassette recorded in the Chacabuco prison camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, formed by Ángel Parra and led by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had already been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group's conductor. »
[...]
« The Chacabuco Mass consists of eight songs: four by Ángel Parra, composed in the camp, and four by Ariel Ramírez from his Misa Criolla (Creole Mass) recorded by Los Fronterizos* in the 1960s: 'After plowing the earth' (Ángel Parra), 'Kyrie' (Ariel Ramírez), 'Gloria' (Ariel Ramírez), 'Sanctus' (Ariel Ramírez), 'Exclamation' (Ángel Parra), 'Agnus Dei' (Ariel Ramírez), 'Man of clay' (Ángel Parra) and 'Ave Maria' (Ángel Parra). »
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The Little Fence (La rejita)

Song by:
lyrics: collective creation; music: “Jálame la pitita” by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Experience in:
« Let’s get going, would say “the lizards”, as we called the policemen because they dress all in green. I looked and looked so I wouldn’t forget anything, because I didn’t know how many years I would be locked up for. I was emotional too: one gets frightened. Against the traffic, they turn the wheel. »
[...]
« After singing “La rejita” in Mass, the squaddies of the Regiment and the priest asked us to sing it again. It became an anthem - a hit. »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Song by:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Experience in:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« When the day arrived, before the audience, this music sounded innovative. When we finished our turn on stage, there was a massive applause and the jury decided that 'Se escucha muy lejos' should be the winner of the prize in the International Category. I can't quite remember - was it perhaps Luis Corvalán? At any rate, one of the miscreants, as we called the 'UP hierarchy' (Unidad Popular, that is, People's Unity), who were separated from us in the concentration camp but were allowed to take part in the cultural activities, was the person who presented us with the award: a medal made from a coin and displaying a seagull, Ritoque's Seagull. »
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Oh Saving Victim (O salutaris Hostia)

Song by:
text by Saint Thomas Aquinas; music by Lorenzo Perosi
Testimony by:
Roberto Navarrete
Experience in:
Cárcel de Santiago, November 1973 - April 1974
« The political prisoners’ cell block in Santiago Prison was established when they transferred many people from the National Stadium in October or November 1973. I was first held in the Stadium. I was 18 when they arrested me. »
[...]
« Sit sempiterna gloria »
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Captain, our Destiny is a Wandering Island (Capitán, el rumbo es una isla errante)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song was dedicated to Óscar Castro, who I was lucky enough to meet in 1975, in Puchuncaví. With his experience in theatre – Óscar was already a fairly well-known actor before his arrest – he threw himself into the cultural work we had organised, in what was then called “Camp Melinka” where the prisoners presented a show every Friday. »
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King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« “Ñaca-ñaca” was an interjection we used at Camp Melinka whenever we wanted to signal and poke fun at any dark thought that might crossed our minds. That may be why it seemed the ideal name to give to the papier maché puppet that played the role of the mean king in the puppet stories we performed to entertain the children who came to visit their captive fathers. But Ñaca-Ñaca’s important role was more than that. The paper model was borrowed to perform the 'star role' in one of the cultural events we customarily staged every Friday. Events which, it should be pointed out, were attended only by captives and armed guards. It was a “Prisoners’ Show”, full of fantasy. »
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« Ñaca-Ñaca  - the puppet - in his role as mean king, was certainly a third-class king, a dictator who enjoyed ridiculing his prisoners. These were none other than: Cinturón de Lana (Woolen Belt), Anillo de Metal (Metal Ring), Huesito (Little Bone) and Caballito de Mar (Seahorse). These were all allegorical figures that had great meaning for us as prime examples of the handicraft that came from the hands of our fellow prisoners. In this play Ñaca-Ñaca’s guards – his soldiers – were the Puínes, which directly alluded to the barbed wire. It would have been difficult to make it any clearer: what we were doing was a staged and metaphorical enactment of our own story. And we did it with a good measure of optimism, as shown in the fact that at the end Ñaca-Ñaca loses his voice – that is, his power - and he loses his mind. Thus the captives become free. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
[...]
« Cecilia and Flavio had a two-year-old child, whom she called Lalito and whom she’d constantly talk about to us. She was also about five months pregnant and by then had something of a belly. Since I used to sleep with her curled up in a "spoon" at the head of the bed – while another person slept at the foot - I sometimes felt the slight movements and small kicks of the baby she was carrying against my back. These brief moments of life passing between entwined bodies are some of the most powerful experiences I have ever had. »
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Dona Nobis Pacem

Song by:
Text from Agnus Dei (Roman Catholic Mass); music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Experience in:
« Music was always present in my family. My dad played the violin and my mum the piano. When I was a child, my mum sent us to dance and piano lessons. I also learnt at the Evangelical Church and sang on the radio. My husband Mario played the guitar very well and had a wonderful tenor voice. We made a good duo. I could find the second voice for any bolero. »
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« Text from Agnus Dei (Roman Catholic Mass); music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart »
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St John Passion (Pasión según San Juan)

Song by:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This song is the third track on the cassette recorded in the Chacabuco concentration camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, formed by Ángel Parra and conducted by him until his release. This song, like the Gospel of Luke, was performed by Los de Chacabuco during the masses offered by the chaplains for the benefit of both prisoners and soldiers. The narrator, as was the case for other religious pieces, was Antonio. »
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