168 results where found for «I Can Trust the Lord»


Dona Nobis Pacem

Song by:
Text from Agnus Dei (Roman Catholic Mass); music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Experience in:
« Music was always present in my family. My dad played the violin and my mum the piano. When I was a child, my mum sent us to dance and piano lessons. I also learnt at the Evangelical Church and sang on the radio. My husband Mario played the guitar very well and had a wonderful tenor voice. We made a good duo. I could find the second voice for any bolero. »
[...]
« We rehearsed a couple of religious songs and sang during a mass led by a Jesuit priest. This inspired me the Catholic communion for the first time. I remember that that day we sang the canon “Dona nobis pacem”, which I had taught not only to the prisoners but also to the nuns. The nuns' choir and ours joined forces. The result was beautiful. We were a novelty. The following Sunday the church was full because people wanted to hear us sing. »
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Friend (Amiga)

Song by:
Miguel Bosé
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« When they arrested me I was 19 years old. I was one of the youngest political prisoners at the time in Arica. »
[...]
« Even in the worst moment a song can calm you down, it can hug you. He was on the other side but I felt him close by. »
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You Will Pay (The Cigarette Smoke) (Pagarás [El humo del cigarrillo])

Song by:
Manuel Mantilla
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Experience in:
« The political prisoners were isolated but when they made us go down to the courtyard, we were with the common prisoners. They listened to the song ‘El humo del cigarillo’ on the radio. That is the first song I remember from the period during which I was imprisoned. »
[...]
« A political prisoner can be isolated for days on end. A common prisoner gets bored, strangles themselves. But not us: we have singing, strength, struggle. That carries us forward and distinguishes us from common prisoners. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Song by:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Experience in:
« The political prisoners organised mate-drinking gatherings once or twice a week, during which we did poetry and sang songs, amongst them ‘El cautivo de Til Til’ by Patricio Manns, ‘Samba Landó’ and ‘Vuelvo’ by Inti-Illimani, ‘Valparaíso’ by Osvaldo ‘Gitano’ Rodríguez, and songs by Eduardo ‘Gato’ Alquinta and Silvio Rodríguez. »
[...]
« ‘El cautivo de Til Til’ had a special significance. As many of the prisoners were from El Frente *, ‘El cautivo de Til Til’ turned into our hymn. When they transferred another fellow and me to La Serena Prison, we also sang the song there. It was appropriate at that moment due to the number of people who were falling down. It would awake a feeling of injustice and abuse. »
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How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos)

Song by:
Unknown. Popularised by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Scarlett Mathieu
« In Cuatro Álamos, I was profoundly marked by the singing of a current detained-disappeared named Juan Chacón. He sang ‘En qué nos parecemos’, a love song from the Spanish Civil War. It remained engraved in me because that comrade disappeared from Cuatro Álamos. »
[...]
« These songs were very important and significant for all. I tried to remember the names of the people who sang them. »
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Moments (Los momentos)

Song by:
Eduardo Gatti
Testimony by:
Scarlett Mathieu
« ‘Moments’ was a song sung by the female comrades whose partners were imprisoned on the other side of Tres Álamos, or were fugitives or disappeared. We all sang it, but it was like their anthem. »
[...]
« There was a very dear comrade who loved ‘Candombe para José’. She even requested that the song was sung for her funeral. »
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Shadows (Sombras)

Song by:
Rosario Sansores and Carlos Brito Benavides. Popularised in Chile by Lucho Barrios.
Testimony by:
Juan Carlos de Luján Peralta Aranguiz
« I arrived in this place as a war prisoner when I was sixteen years old. »
[...]
« In Blas Cañas, many of my mornings began listening to the song “Shadows”. I didn’t know the song at the time. It wasn’t to my taste. »
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Cantata Santa María de Iquique

Song by:
Luis Advis
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla
« Between March 1974 and July 1975, I had the opportunity to arrange about 200 songs and direct the production of the <i>Cantata de Santa María de Iquique. In truth, the prison was my conservatoire. That’s where I learnt the basics of the profession of musician. »
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A finger-picked Cueca from a solidary companion (Cueca punteada de un solidario)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« It is true that the hard experience of torture and prison unified us and at times even generated strong ties of friendship among the prisoners. But, if we are being honest, we have to say that it was not all friendship and solidarity among the political prisoners. The left-wing political parties continued their ideological struggles inside the prisons, and, at worst, helped to deteriorate the already foul atmosphere of captivity. If the political constellation of the inmates was explosive, life inside a cell could become a psychological torment as bad or worse than the physical torture. Sectarianism and mistrust were common, and there were only few people with whom one could talk about personal issues, without fearing that the whole party would know about it the next day. Weaknesses were not tolerated. »
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Everything Changes (Todo cambia)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My guitar accompanied me for the entire time that I was deprived of freedom. It was like a magnet. In the afternoon we would sing and play in the courtyard. »
[...]
« I often remember an older woman who came in because of drug trafficking. Her life had fallen apart but she wanted to get ahead. We came to have enough considerable trust to have conversations. »
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