126 results where found for «Jorge Peña Hen»


Lament for the Death of Augusto the Dog (Lamento a la muerte del perro Augusto)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Augusto the dog (not to be confused with the journalist Augusto Olivares, affectionately nicknamed "Augusto the Dog", who was murdered in the Presidential Palace on 11 September 1973), was the mascot of the political prisoners held at the Ritoque concentration camp, and accompanied his master when the military junta decided to close that prison and transfer the inmates to the neighbouring Puchuncaví concentration camp. »
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The Valley Swallow (La golondrina del valle)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« One of the most amazing experiences I had during my six months in the Puchuncaví Prison Camp was to see the metamorphosis of the barbed wire fence into a huge musical score. This happened when a flock of swallows made a surprise visit and hundreds of them perched at different heights on the stiff barbed wire. It was the image that inspired this song. »
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Beloved Friend (Amado amigo)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song, written in my cell at the Puchuncaví Prison Camp, speaks to a friend and fellow prisoner; it could be any one of the thousands behind bars. »
[...]
« Breadcrumbs (migas de pan): These were the raw material we used in the interrogation centres for sculpting little figurines. This activity was important to the prisoners' minds occupied. In situations of extreme solitary confinement, when all contact with the outside world had been cut off, prisoners used these figurines to build a tiny bridge of communication with their fellow prisoners. A person in solitary confinement would place the figurine where others could see it, leaving leave a sign life. »
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Poet of Destiny (Poeta del destino)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« This song is a tribute to Miguel Enríquez, Secretary General of the Movement of the Revolutionary Left (MIR), who was gunned down by a commando of the dictatorship’s secret police on 5 October 1974. My own five-year militancy in that organisation resulted in my enormous respect for this individual. »
[...]
« The original text was created in the Capuchinos Prison (my last stop in Chile before leaving for exile in Germany), and underwent substantial changes in the early 1980s (which in my view enrich the composition) when I had the chance to read the moving speech given by Edgardo Enríquez, father of the political leader, at the opening ceremony of the Miguel Enríquez Clinical Hospital in Havana, Cuba. »
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The Brief Space Where You Are Absent (El breve espacio en que no estás)

Song by:
Pablo Milanés
Testimony by:
Vilma Rojas Toledo
Experience in:
Cárcel de Coronel, 1986 - 1988
« I recall that during my time as a political prisoner Pablo Milanés was one of our greatest companions. His songs filled us with life, helped us to keep breathing and living behind the bars imposed by Pinochet’s military dictatorship. Personally, I remember the song “El breve espacio en que no estás” (“The brief space where you are absent”) because it sparked such heated debate among my comrades that you would think we were trying to resolve a vital political issue. »
[...]
« One specific phrase set off the controversy: “la prefiero compartida antes que vaciar mi vida” (“I prefer to share her rather than empty out my life”). So we transcribed the song. That was difficult because we listened to the song on a small cassette. Then we analyzed its words, phrase by phrase over a couple of days. We listened to it over and over again. »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
José Selín Carrasco Vargas
« While we were imprisoned in Melinka, this song was sung every time that one of us was released. I remember a fellow prisoner nicknamed Bigote Molina (Moustache Molina) singing the song when we were going to Tres Álamos, from where we would be released a few days later. »
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Free (Libre)

Song by:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Experience in:
« I’m from Chol Chol, part of the Coihue community. I was arrested along with twelve other people and they took us to the Second Police Station of Temuco. I was 30 years old. It was a week before I was due to get married. »
[...]
« When I remember the torture, “Free” immediately comes to mind. But I can barely remember the melody, because I haven’t listened to Nino Bravo songs since then. »
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Three white lilies (Tres blancos lirios)

Song by:
Unknown composer. This song probably relates to European early-years pedagogy.
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
Experience in:
« They arrested me at my workplace in October 1973 . I was 31 years old and worked as a porter at a logging business in Chumpullo, near Valdivia. »
[...]
« First I was at a police station where they tortured me. They then kept me at a military base in Valdivia. »
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The Wall (La muralla)

Song by:
Nicolás Guillén (lyrics) and Quilapayún (music)
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
« In prison, there was a guy who played the guitar. He cheered up the afternoons in the cell. We all sang with him. »
[...]
« For Christmas, we got permission for our wives and children to come visit us. We sang “Noche de Paz”, “Señora Doña María” and “Arrorró mi niño”. When our visitors brought food, we would share it with the gendarmes. They were starving. They were conscripted youngsters. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Song by:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
anónimo
Experience in:
« I was detained in Panguipulli on 24 September 1973, along with 17 other young people. I was a high school student. I was also working at the forestry and logging company of Huilo Huilo, which had been taken over by the working class. We were tortured for two or three days at the police station of Panguipulli. They left me unconscious. »
[...]
« Then they took us to a police station in Valdivia. In the stables they took our names and addresses, and then sent us to the prison on Teja Island. In the prison, one of the prisoners spent night and day in a dungeon. Despite being in solitary confinement, he would open his window and sing the National Anthem at full blast. We all went outside to have a look, even the guards. The prisoner didn’t sing the verse about the brave soldiers, out of protest I imagine. He sang for about four days. After that we heard nothing more about him. »
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