127 results where found for «Jorge Peña Hen»


Blue Eyes (Ojos azules)

Author:
Manuel Casazola Huancco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January – February 1974
« This is the last track on the cassette recorded by the band Los de Chacabuco in the concentration camp; it was digitised in 2015. They played at the prisoners' weekly show. The song was very popular in Chile in the 1960s and many bands included it in their repertoire. The quena is played by Ricardo Yocelewski and the charango is played by Luis Cifuentes. »
[...]
« You will cry when I leave, »
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The Crux of the Matter (La madre del cordero)

Author:
Tito Fernández
Testimony by:
Servando Becerra Poblete
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, 9 November 1973 - 10 November 1974
« I recited this poem in the National Stadium. I continued to do so in the Chacabuco prison camp, earning the nickname of “Venancio” from my fellow prisoners. »
[...]
« Of course when you're a kid »
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Song of a Middle-Class Man (Canción de un hombre medio)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« In our political discussions, we always spoke disdainfully of the middle class. In the view of the Marxist ideologues in prison, that sector of society supported the dictatorship and it was necessary to reverse that trend. It was not an active support but rather a passive support that involved laying low and getting by with the dictatorship. »
[...]
« Then they proclaimed order »
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Priests and Soldiers (Curas y milicos)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« I don’t want to exaggerate but Camp Melinka became not only a factory that produced handicrafts and a performance hall but also a university. Every day there were classes to learn foreign languages, art, medicine or literature. Solar ovens were built. Talks were given on arachnology. Literacy programmes were offered. »
[...]
« and when he dies of old age »
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King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« “Ñaca-ñaca” was an interjection we used at Camp Melinka whenever we wanted to signal and poke fun at any dark thought that might crossed our minds. That may be why it seemed the ideal name to give to the papier maché puppet that played the role of the mean king in the puppet stories we performed to entertain the children who came to visit their captive fathers. But Ñaca-Ñaca’s important role was more than that. The paper model was borrowed to perform the 'star role' in one of the cultural events we customarily staged every Friday. Events which, it should be pointed out, were attended only by captives and armed guards. It was a “Prisoners’ Show”, full of fantasy. »
[...]
« And when he was in a bad mood »
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May the Omelette Flip Over (Que la tortilla se vuelva)

Author:
Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio. Ppopularized by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Claudio Melgarejo
Place & date:
« I spent a week in captivity, in November 1973. I didn’t hear many songs, but the most popular ones sung by my comrades were "Venceremos" (We shall be victorious) and “Que la tortilla se vuelva” (May the omelette flip over), also known as "The tomato song", which portrays the bosses' exploitation of the workers. At that time, the young in Latin American were steeped in revolutionary change and we empathised with the situation around Che Guevara and Cuba. »
[...]
« When will God in heaven wish »
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Captain, our Destiny is a Wandering Island (Capitán, el rumbo es una isla errante)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song was dedicated to Óscar Castro, who I was lucky enough to meet in 1975, in Puchuncaví. With his experience in theatre – Óscar was already a fairly well-known actor before his arrest – he threw himself into the cultural work we had organised, in what was then called “Camp Melinka” where the prisoners presented a show every Friday. »
[...]
« when raging wind, »
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What Will the Holy Father Say (Qué dirá el Santo Padre)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Place & date:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We sang songs that were popular at the time. We’d sing "What will the Holy Father say," especially the part that says "What will the Holy Father who lives in Rome say ... they are slitting the throat of his dove..." quite often, for example when someone was taken off to Regimiento Arica, which was a torture centre. We would also sing "La golondrina" (The swallow), which was very symbolic, because even though we were imprisoned, we could "fly", our thoughts soaring beyond the prison walls... »
[...]
« when they actually deprive us of it »
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La López Pereyra

Author:
Artidorio Cresseri
Testimony by:
Germán Larrabe
« This Argentine zamba* was the first song we tried to perform in Puchuncaví, with a group made up of prisoners transferred from Chacabuco Detention Camp together with us, newly arrived 'Puchuncas'. »
[...]
« and whenever I am thoughtful and alone »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Author:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This tonada song* recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. That afternoon of 11 September 1973, I was at school marking some music tests. After a while I heard a very loud bang on the door and went to open it at once. It was the police. »
[...]
« Then my mother arrived »
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