180 results where found for «Lament for the Death of Augusto the Dog»


The Little Fence (La rejita)

Music piece by:
lyrics: collective creation; music: 'Jálame la pitita' by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Detention in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We always sang this song when we were taken to Regimiento Arica. That was a torture centre. »
[...]
« This prison had been a children's home before. It was run by the Congregation of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd. People always said that these were 'good' nuns. I don’t know if that’s the right word. It sticks in my throat that consecrated nuns should be able to accept female political prisoners. »
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Three Mountaineers (Eran tres alpinos)

Music piece by:
Unknown. Traditional Spanish children's song
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Detention in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We adapted this song and produced a play based on it. Each of us played one of the characters. We spent a lot of time on this. »
[...]
« We performed the play to the other women prisoners in both centres within the prison: Regina Coellys and Alborada. Alborada was a section of Buen Pastor but it was not part of the prison facility. Alborada housed female political prisoners too. »
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The Scholar (El letrado)

Music piece by:
Quelentaro (Gastón and Eduardo Guzmán)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Detention in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 – February 1974
« From the first time I heard it, I was impressed by the way the duo Quelentaro sang this song, which was also written by them. When I sang it, I always tried to sing it in their style. I never sang it on stage, only for myself or for small groups of friends strumming guitars together. »
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Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Music piece by:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Detention in:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of 'lack of evidence', after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« Just before midnight on New Year’s Eve of 1988, as they did every year, the youths of the Brigada Ramona Parra saluted the crowd on Tucapel road. »
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Little Doctors (Doctorcitos)

Music piece by:
Unknown. Folk tune from the Andes highlands
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego
« In 1974 - I don’t quite remember the month - the Chacabuco Olympics were held. The opening ceremony consisted of symbolically carrying the Olympic torch through the concentration camp. »
[...]
« The march was accompanied by the sounds of the quena played by Ricardo Yocelevsky, a former member of the group Los Curacas. I remember the song as a taquirari from Los Chaskas, a Bolivian group that performed at the Viña del Mar Festival on one occasion. »
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We Shall Overcome

Music piece by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Héctor Salgado
« I would like to add, to the testimony of Alfonso Padilla, a picture of the musical group that performed the Joan Baez song, 'We Shall Overcome'. This group was formed and led by Alfonso Padilla during his time in prison. I was one of the first guitar students of Padilla. »
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How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos)

Music piece by:
Unknown. Popularised by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Scarlett Mathieu
« In Cuatro Álamos, I was profoundly marked by the singing of a current detained-disappeared named Juan Chacón. He sang ‘En qué nos parecemos’, a love song from the Spanish Civil War. It remained engraved in me because that comrade disappeared from Cuatro Álamos. »
[...]
« For me, ‘En qué nos parecemos’ is the symbol of the period of solitary confinement. In my case, it was not very long and then they sent me to a place where I wasn’t isolated anymore. »
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The Clock (El reloj)

Music piece by:
Roberto Cantoral
Testimony by:
Ana María Arenas
« The day I was captured, after the first torture session, I asked for permission to sing a Christmas carol, the name of which I cannot remember. I did it to let one of my captive friends know that I was also at the Venda Sexy. »
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Lili Marlene

Music piece by:
Hans Leip
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
Detention in:
« During the daily flag-lowering ritual in the camp Melinka, the prisoners first had to get into formation in the courtyard and then walk in line to the location of the mast. »
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King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)

Music piece by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
Detention in:
« During the last third of the 20th century, the concentration camps of the Chilean dictatorship were characterised by a high grade of organisation among prisoners, as well as the overflowing creativity they applied to all areas of human ingenuity. »
[...]
« Initially, the theatre performances were meant to entertain the children coming to see their parents during visits. These then generated more complex works played by the prisoners, always under the watchful eye of the commanders who sometimes understood what was happening but often did not. »
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