57 results where found for «Las mañanitas»


Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Song by:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of “lack of evidence”, after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« splashing it riverbed »
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To my Little Dove (A mi palomita)

Song by:
Teófilo Vargas Candia, popularised in Chile by the group Quilapayún
Testimony by:
David Quintana García
Experience in:
Cárcel de Rancagua, 1974 - 1975
« On 10 September 1974, a folk band of Communist Youth activists arrived at the prison of Rancagua. They were arrested to prevent them from participating in the demonstrations and other acts against the dictatorship on 11 September through their role as musicians and activists. They were freed on the 12th. They were arrested again in September 1975. »
[...]
« Saima kita motu tumallasketa »
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I Come Back (Vuelvo)

Song by:
Patricio Manns (lyrics) and Horacio Salinas (music)
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Experience in:
« During our mate-drinking gatherings in the Prison of Santiago, we always talked about the song ‘Vuelvo’. It gave you the hope of returning to the fight. The prison was only something temporary. »
[...]
« At the end of the last kiss. »
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We Shall Overcome

Song by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« These performances were divided in two parts, each lasting around 40 minutes. In one we presented the "Cantata of Santa María de Iquique", but that's another story. With a smaller group, which we called The Hard-boiled Eggs (I still have no idea where that name came from or how we chose it), we presented a show every other Sunday at noon. There we’d accompany anyone who wanted to sing a song of their choice. But that, too, is another story. »
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Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Song by:
Unknown. Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on "Makhnovtchina", attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Experience in:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. Our comrade and beloved friend Sergio Pérez Molina, leader of the MIR who had fallen into the hands of the DINA a few days earlier, was being tortured again. We had already seen him disfigured by the blows; they had even applied electricity to a bullet wound when they shot him at the time of his arrest. Moren Brito boasted that he had run a pick-up truck over Sergio’s body. »
[...]
« The Amur partisans were transformed into the partisans of "amor" (love), as rendered by the translations of that song that celebrates the courage of the guerrillas who fought on the shores of the river of the same name. Precisely that love uniting us is what gave us strength to resist. In the same way, we also sang “L'Internationale” when on 5 October Miguel's assassins returned triumphantly to the facility. »
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Dreams of my Imprisonment (Sueños de mi encierro)

Song by:
Mario Patricio Cordero Cedraschi
Testimony by:
Mario Patricio Cordero Cedraschi
Experience in:
Cárcel de Valparaíso, Winter of 1975
« I’d spent two years in prison and there was no end in sight for my time in jail. I observed during visiting hours that many prisoners had children, a wife, family; in my case, however, having been arrested so young and just turned 19, I felt a growing concern that I’d die without bearing children, and never experience this wonderful human feeling. »
[...]
« This concern became a nightmare and led to these verses that turned into a song and filled the last page of my prison songbook, where I’d written down a number of ballads sung by other prisoners. For a while, a musician from Valparaíso shared my cell and taught me my first chords. When he went into exile he left me his guitar, which was my companion for another long year in captivity. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Song by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Experience in:
« Preparations for that Wednesday night became more intense. It would be a different night. We women prisoners had secretly organised ourselves, but more importantly, we had also coordinated with the male prisoners. I’m not sure whether it was our idea or whether the men had proposed it. That detail is irrelevant now. »
[...]
« Another important thing is that we had been able to get the word to Lola, as we shall call her here. She was barely more than a child. She was short, had black hair, a tinkling-bell laugh, and sparkling eyes. She lived in the neighbourhood nearby, on the other side of that long wall, now painted white. She had been with us a few months and when the day of her release came, she cried and cried and cried. At last, she was getting out, but she was taking the sadness of leaving us behind with her. »
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Errant Wind (Viento errante)

Song by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Testimony by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Experience in:
« Finally, in the Chacabuco Concentration Camp, after three days aboard the "Policarpo Toro" (a war ship which had an uncertain destination since sailing from Valparaíso in December 1973; the question was not when and where we would dock, but how we would fall overboard), I felt that death had decided to take a step back and watch from me from a little further away... »
[...]
« "Errant wind " (composed towards the end of that year during the improvised "literary workshop" in which Salas, Montealegre, another prisoner and myself, tried to divert the raw pain of those hours, exploring some possible forms of "existential meaning"), a song more unconscious than conscious, which attempted from its inception to idealise freedom in the shape of a woman without a defined face or name although, on the other hand, she embodied all the roles of a woman: mother, daughter, sister, girlfriend... »
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Today I Sing for the Sake of Singing (Hoy canto por cantar)

Song by:
Nydia Caro and Riccardo Cerratto
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Experience in:
« I have never been a great music listener. Nevertheless, before the coup I used to listen to Nueva Canción, especially Quilapayún and Rolando Alarcón. I also liked cumbias, to fool around. We would dance and have fun. On the other hand, and this is more due to my family, I have always liked classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky. It stirs important things in me. It moves me. »
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Tacit Song (Canción tácita)

Song by:
All the women present at that moment in Chacabuco
Testimony by:
Mónica García Cuadra
Experience in:
« I am the daughter of a former political prisoner who spent a long time imprisoned at Chacabuco, among other places. I am Monica, a little 9-year-old girl who travelled with a heavy heart full of sadness to visit her father, Gerardo García Salas, held at the Chacabuco concentration camp. I am an only child and in my young life he is my sole reference point and, in essence, my image of masculinity. »
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