325 results where found for «Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)»


The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Author:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Place & date:
« One of the most important songs in the detention centres. Impossible to count how many times we sang it. Every time someone was released from a detention camp or there was credible information that a person would be sent into exile, a gigantic chorus would sing this song, in a powerful unison. No one could possibly forget it. Especially significant at Tres Álamos, as this was the “exit” camp. »
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Creole Mass – Gloria (Misa criolla - Gloria)

Author:
Ariel Ramírez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – December 1973
« As far as I remember (and there may be other versions) the "Los de Chacabuco" band was founded by Ángel Parra in response to a request by the Army chaplain Varela, who asked for assistance for the Mass he celebrated for both prisoners and soldiers. Our first musical presentation was the Creole Mass by Ariel Ramírez. »
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For the Guy Who's Leaving

Author:
Alfredo Zitarrosa
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – April 1974
« Marcelo Concha Bascuñán, member of the Los de Chacabuco band, was a young man of great charisma and personal skills. He had been a swimming champion, and was an outstanding guitarist and singer. »
[...]
« In the Chacabuco concentration camp he was renowned for his charm, excellent mood and spirit of collaboration. He taught songs to many of his colleagues, including myself, although I should note that I could never pluck the guitar as well as him. Marcelo was released from Chacabuco in April 1974. Later he was arrested again, and he is missing to this date. »
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Love Song (Canción de amor)

Author:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – December 1973
« Ángel Parra organised and directed the band Los de Chacabuco until his release from prison. Angel only conducted the group, and never sang or played an instrument. The exception was his farewell concert, which was the only time he sang at Chacabuco. One of the songs he performed on that occasion was this one, dedicated to his wife. When Angel was released, Ernesto Parra became the group’s conductor. »
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Tacit Song (Canción tácita)

Author:
All the women present at that moment in Chacabuco
Testimony by:
Mónica García Cuadra
Place & date:
« I am the daughter of a former political prisoner who spent a long time imprisoned at Chacabuco, among other places. I am Monica, a little 9-year-old girl who travelled with a heavy heart full of sadness to visit her father, Gerardo García Salas, held at the Chacabuco concentration camp. I am an only child and in my young life he is my sole reference point and, in essence, my image of masculinity. »
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An Old Love Tune (Tonada del viejo amor)

Author:
Eduardo Falú and Jaime Dávalos
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« The Los de Chacabuco band, created and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this zamba* by Eduardo Falú and Jaime Davalos at the camp’s weekly shows. »
[...]
« This song can be found on the secret recording made of the farewell show organised for Ángel by Alberto Corvalan. It is called "Zamba Argentina" on the vinyl record released in Italy and on the CD released in Chile. »
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Amalia Rosa

Author:
Tino Carrasco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band founded and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this Venezuelan folk song, known as joropo*, singing it at the weekly prison camp show. I dare say it was one of the favourite songs of the audience, comprised of political prisoners. »
[...]
« This song can be found in Alberto Corvalán’s clandestine recording of the farewell show for Angel. On the recording it is called "Canción de Venezuela". »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Author:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Place & date:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
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Zamba of my Hope (Zamba de mi esperanza)

Author:
Luis H. Profili
Testimony by:
Edgardo Carabantes Olivares
« Horacio Carabantes Olivares, my brother, was locked up in January 1975 at the Maipo regiment of Valparaíso, with a large group of male and female prisoners, all arrested by the DINA. »
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Lucía

Author:
Joan Manuel Serrat
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, December 1974 - May 1976
« Tres Álamos was a more “normal” camp, even though we never had a trial. There was a lot of music, it was sort of ritualistic. There were days when we put more enthusiasm into it, on Saturdays or Sundays after the visits, although I’m not all that sure. »
[...]
« ‘Candombe para José’ was very important. The line ‘ánimo Negro José’ (‘go for it, Negro José’) was a bit like saying ‘it will go away, there are always other possibilities’. I feel it was an encouraging song and also a way of showing each other affection. Although it’s completely different, ‘Palabras para Julia’ (Words for Julia) also says that there is a future, in spite of the current circumstances. ‘Ode to Joy’ was extremely important. It suggests that there are going to be changes, that our situation is not going to last forever. »
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