127 results where found for «Los momentos»


Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Song by:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of “lack of evidence”, after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« her steps lost in the void »
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A Million Friends (Un millón de amigos)

Song by:
Roberto Carlos
Testimony by:
Pedro Mella Contreras
« I was arrested when I was 32 years old, along with approximately twenty-three other people. »
[...]
« Roberto Carlos »
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Shadows (Sombras)

Song by:
Rosario Sansores and Carlos Brito Benavides. Popularised in Chile by Lucho Barrios.
Testimony by:
Juan Carlos de Luján Peralta Aranguiz
« I arrived in this place as a war prisoner when I was sixteen years old. »
[...]
« Rosario Sansores and Carlos Brito Benavides. Popularised in Chile by Lucho Barrios. »
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We Shall Overcome

Song by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Song by:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Boris Chornik Aberbuch
« The Puchuncaví detention camp’s daily routine included mandatory participation in the ceremonies of raising and taking down the Chilean flag on the flagpole at the entrance to the camp. »
[...]
« Another, very extrovert dog, participated when all of us were quietly awaiting the commander’s order to leave. The dog approached the flagpole, sniffed it, assessed it as the closest thing to a tree available at that moment. Then he did what he had to do by the flagpole. »
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Zamba so as Not to Die (Zamba para no morir)

Song by:
Hamlet Lima Quintana
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Experience in:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« I want to recall a night at Villa Grimaldi. »
[...]
« At that point the guard stopped me and told me to stop buggering around with political ditties. That I should sing a cumbia or something by Roberto Carlos. I went dumb. Then they took us back to our cells, but before going in the guard said to me: “You’re stayin’ out ‘ere, for bein’ stubborn.” I spent a good while in the yard. I was afraid, cold, but I felt I had made a minimum act of resistance and that helped me. »
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Lucky Devil (El suertúo)

Song by:
Víctor Canto and Luis Cifuentes (lyrics), Roberto Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This cueca* was composed at Chacabuco sometime between November 1973 and February 1974 and was sung by Los de Chacabuco, of which Víctor Canto and I were members. »
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A Cocky Fellow (El puntúo)

Song by:
Víctor Canto and Luis Cifuentes (lyrics), Roberto Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This cueca* was composed in Chacabuco between November 1973 and February 1974, and was sung by the band Los de Chacabuco, to which Víctor Canto and I belonged. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Song by:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
María Fedora Peña
Experience in:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« “Look here, Maria Fedora. I’ve brought you a treasure...” - it was the voice of my brother Juan Cristián as he crossed the doorway of our mother’s house one morning in January 1983. Peering over the staircase banister, I saw him raise his right hand with something clenched inside. He was just back from a quick trip to La Serena, and I was spending my holidays in Chile. I had travelled home to show the family my beautiful baby girl, María Paz, my first child born in Caracas. »
[...]
« I took the tiny piece of paper that had been meticulously folded, on which one could make out snippets of musical staves and some notes. Without opening it, I brought the paper to my nose. Closing my eyes, I breathed in deeply, and I felt my father’s scent permeate my soul. There he was! No doubt about it! My eyes flooded with tears and my throat tightened in a knot. We rushed to embrace each other, and Juan Cristián said “Sister, you cry like children do.” He used to tell me that when the sorrows were because of Dad. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Experience in:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
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