874 results where found for «Love Song (Canción de amor)»


From the Poplars I have Come, Mother (De los álamos vengo, madre)

Song by:
Juan Vásquez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band created and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this traditional Spanish song at the Chacabuco concentration camp. »
[...]
« This is one of several Spanish Renaissance songs the group included in its repertory, unlike other songs that originated from Chilean or Latin American folk traditions. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Song by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Experience in:
« Preparations for that Wednesday night became more intense. It would be a different night. We women prisoners had secretly organised ourselves, but more importantly, we had also coordinated with the male prisoners. I’m not sure whether it was our idea or whether the men had proposed it. That detail is irrelevant now. »
[...]
« We sang and sang: 'Ode to Joy', 'El negro José', 'Palabras para Julia', 'No volveré', and we kept singing and singing. We would start singing a song and the men, fellow prisoners on the other side, beyond the walls that separated us, would respond. That night we went to bed around one in the morning, exhausted and hoarse but so happy. We had broken the chains - it was still possible to think of freedom. »
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Futuristic Anthem (Himno futurista)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Patricio Polanco
Experience in:
« In 1973 and 1974, Pisagua was characterised by the harsh and cruel treatment of political prisoners. Singing was mandatory for prisoners, who were guarded by Army platoons, and it was also a means to avoid beatings and collective mistreatment. »
[...]
« The repertory consisted of approximately 35 military anthems from all branches of the Armed Forces. To these military songs, we added a few songs or anthems that became a form of resistance and asserting our dignity, albeit not explicitly. The lyrics shown below sometimes varied a bit, but this became the anthem most sung by prisoners at the Pisagua concentration camp. »
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Saint Gregory’s Tonada (Tonada San Gregorio)

Song by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
Testimony by:
Pedro Humire Loredo
« This tonada song* recalls the horrible situation I was subjected to in the cells of the police station in the San Gregorio district in southern Santiago. That afternoon of 11 September 1973, I was at school marking some music tests. After a while I heard a very loud bang on the door and went to open it at once. It was the police. »
[...]
« In the late afternoon we were put on a bus and told to lie face down. We did not know where we were being taken. We heard the police and guards saying that we would be taken to the Tacna regiment and then to Chile Stadium, but both facilities were already jam-packed with detainees. Eventually we were taken to the National Stadium, where we were kept for two months. It was then that, in silence, this song welled up within me: “Cárcel de San Gregorio” (Saint Gregory’s Jail). »
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Errant Wind (Viento errante)

Song by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Testimony by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Experience in:
« Finally, in the Chacabuco Concentration Camp, after three days aboard the "Policarpo Toro" (a war ship which had an uncertain destination since sailing from Valparaíso in December 1973; the question was not when and where we would dock, but how we would fall overboard), I felt that death had decided to take a step back and watch from me from a little further away... »
[...]
« "Errant wind " (composed towards the end of that year during the improvised "literary workshop" in which Salas, Montealegre, another prisoner and myself, tried to divert the raw pain of those hours, exploring some possible forms of "existential meaning"), a song more unconscious than conscious, which attempted from its inception to idealise freedom in the shape of a woman without a defined face or name although, on the other hand, she embodied all the roles of a woman: mother, daughter, sister, girlfriend... »
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After the War (Después de la guerra)

Song by:
Sandro
Testimony by:
Nelly Andrade Alcaino
« The military officials in charge of the Tejas Verdes camp made us sing, and they gave us just one day to select the songs and rehearse. »
[...]
« There were 15 women in our room. We began proposing songs. One person tried to invent a song that included a line that went something like: “my little bright-eyed lieutenant”, which the rest of the group vetoed. Then we thought of the song "Libre" ("Free", popularised by Nino Bravo), which the group also vetoed: we were locked in the room day and night, allowed out only a couple of times a day to go to the bathroom. »
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South-Eastern Storm (La Sudestada)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Experience in:
« While I was in solitary confinement in Cuatro Álamos, one day I noticed there was a large room at the end of the corridor, which, overnight, the "dinos" (members of the DINA secret police) had filled with prisoners. At the end of the day, these comrades organised quite a "jamboree": talking, sharing information, asking questions and singing. It was a frenetic activity of solidarity, support, courage and warmth. »
[...]
« Although I only heard the song a few times before Carabantes disappeared from the prison block, I’ve never forgotten it. During my years in exile I sang "his" song as often as I could and to whomever wanted to listen. It leaves everyone moved even if they don’t understand Spanish. »
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Lili Marlene

Song by:
Hans Leip
Testimony by:
Rogelio Felipe Castillo Acevedo
« We were forced to belt out these marching songs. There was a comrade who had a limp and wore a platform shoe. When we marched his limp would throw us out of step, and then the marines would give us a good kicking. When they realised what was causing our lack of coordination, they left that comrade out of the marches. »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Experience in:
« One of the most important songs in the detention centres. Impossible to count how many times we sang it. Every time someone was released from a detention camp or there was credible information that a person would be sent into exile, a gigantic chorus would sing this song, in a powerful unison. No one could possibly forget it. Especially significant at Tres Álamos, as this was the “exit” camp. »
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Today I Sing for the Sake of Singing (Hoy canto por cantar)

Song by:
Nydia Caro and Riccardo Cerratto
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Experience in:
« I have never been a great music listener. Nevertheless, before the coup I used to listen to Nueva Canción, especially Quilapayún and Rolando Alarcón. I also liked cumbias, to fool around. We would dance and have fun. On the other hand, and this is more due to my family, I have always liked classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky. It stirs important things in me. It moves me. »
[...]
« The noise was loud but I was doing my own thing. The only thing that would change the noise to music for me was this song. I have no idea how many times I listened to it. For me it was reiterative. »
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