153 results where found for «Melody by Jorge Peña Hen»


Errant Wind (Viento errante)

Song by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Testimony by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Experience in:
« Finally, in the Chacabuco Concentration Camp, after three days aboard the "Policarpo Toro" (a war ship which had an uncertain destination since sailing from Valparaíso in December 1973; the question was not when and where we would dock, but how we would fall overboard), I felt that death had decided to take a step back and watch from me from a little further away... »
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South-Eastern Storm (La Sudestada)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Experience in:
« While I was in solitary confinement in Cuatro Álamos, one day I noticed there was a large room at the end of the corridor, which, overnight, the "dinos" (members of the DINA secret police) had filled with prisoners. At the end of the day, these comrades organised quite a "jamboree": talking, sharing information, asking questions and singing. It was a frenetic activity of solidarity, support, courage and warmth. »
[...]
« When I became a recognised prisoner and was allowed to talk to other prisoners, I tried to find the comrade behind the song, but no one knew of his whereabouts. Some time afterwards someone told me that his name was Horacio Carabantes, and he was from Valparaíso. »
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Sufferings (Dolencias)

Song by:
Víctor Valencia Nieto
Testimony by:
Domingo Chávez Navarro
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - April 1974
« Marcelo Concha Bascuñán sang this song, which many of us liked. I personally knew Marcelo and we were both released from prison at the same time. I left the country, whereas Marcelo stayed in Chile. The DINA picked him up and since then he is one of so many disappeared people. »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Experience in:
« One of the most important songs in the detention centres. Impossible to count how many times we sang it. Every time someone was released from a detention camp or there was credible information that a person would be sent into exile, a gigantic chorus would sing this song, in a powerful unison. No one could possibly forget it. Especially significant at Tres Álamos, as this was the “exit” camp. »
[...]
« If freedom was decreed when the prisoner was at another camp, the prisoner would be transferred to this detention centre. In the version sung in the camps, the verse that goes, “se va, se va, se va y regresará” (“going away, going away, going away and will come back”) was replaced by “se va, se va, se va y no volverá” (“going away, going away, going away, never to come back”). »
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Free (Libre)

Song by:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
anónimo
Experience in:
« While waiting in the grandstands to be interrogated for the first, second or more times, we would sing "Free" to those who were being lined up to be released. "Free" was a catharsis, a mixture of joy for those who were going and hope for those of us left behind. Unfortunately, the dictatorship and its civil and military henchmen employed the song for their own propaganda. »
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We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Song by:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Experience in:
« The parish priest at Buen Pastor played the accordion. He played so beautifully. Because I played the piano, I asked him if I could borrow it. “I’ll lend it to you” he said. Discreetly I began to learn “Venceremos”, “La Internacional”, the National Anthem and the Anthem of the Police. They made us all learn the Anthem of the Police and I knew it from my dad, who was an officer. »
[...]
« Learning all these songs on the accordion turned out to be a rather tiring task, all the more so since I could only do it in the afternoons, when the girlies went to watch their beloved soap operas. Marisa Cruces (title character of the Mexican soap opera La cruz de Marisa Cruces) sure had a hold on the heterogeneous audience made up of serious criminals, petty criminals, guards, traitors to the Fatherland and nuns. They would all cry about the vicissitudes the protagonist endured. »
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The Internationale

Song by:
Eugène Pottier (lyrics) and Pierre Degeyter (music). Popularised by Quilapayún in 1970s Chile.
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Experience in:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« In April 1975, the triumph in Vietnam was celebrated. We heard about it through a comrade who went to the bathroom and found a piece of the week’s newspaper. It was so beautiful for us to be there, having shouted so often for Vietnam at demonstrations. »
[...]
« So a group of prisoners from the Tower (*) decided to sing a bit from The Internationale. And we sang all together. We would coordinate through secret mail: for example, messages would be exchanged when someone went to the bathroom. The guards arrived and started shouting “what is happening here?”, kicking about. We managed to sing two or three verses. This was another example of music in conditions of extreme oppression. »
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Anthem of Puchuncaví (Himno de Puchuncaví)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« A few weeks before being transferred to Valparaíso Jail - where I would face a war council on account of alleged violations of the State Interior Security Law and other military regulations that existed during the state of siege - I wrote a song that I called anthem, because I wanted it to be sung as a group at the end of our cultural events on Fridays. The song was written so that every prisoner, regardless of political affiliation, could sing it. The only way to strengthen prisoners’ unity was to realise that all of us lived in the same conditions. »
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Lament for the Death of Augusto the Dog (Lamento a la muerte del perro Augusto)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Augusto the dog (not to be confused with the journalist Augusto Olivares, affectionately nicknamed "Augusto the Dog", who was murdered in the Presidential Palace on 11 September 1973), was the mascot of the political prisoners held at the Ritoque concentration camp, and accompanied his master when the military junta decided to close that prison and transfer the inmates to the neighbouring Puchuncaví concentration camp. »
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The Valley Swallow (La golondrina del valle)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« One of the most amazing experiences I had during my six months in the Puchuncaví Prison Camp was to see the metamorphosis of the barbed wire fence into a huge musical score. This happened when a flock of swallows made a surprise visit and hundreds of them perched at different heights on the stiff barbed wire. It was the image that inspired this song. »
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