20 results where found for «Mexican Traditional»


Las mañanitas

Author:
Manuel M. Ponce
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, December 1974 - May 1976
« Normally we would sing when they locked us up in the barracks, from seven or eight at night until eight or nine in the morning. Sometimes the guards would come in but didn’t stay. It was our act. »
[...]
« Mexican Traditional »
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Morning Has Broken

Author:
Cat Stevens, based on a traditional Gaelic hymn; lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
« At the time of the coup in 1973, this song was world-famous and frequently played on the radio. As transistor radios were quite small, many people were arrested with one of these in their pockets, and a significant number were not searched and confiscated by the military. This explains why, when we were in the National Stadium, we were able to listen to them, keep track of the news and listen to music. »
[...]
« Cat Stevens, based on a traditional Gaelic hymn; lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon »
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Three Mountaineers (Eran tres alpinos)

Author:
Unknown. Traditional Spanish children's song
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Place & date:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We adapted this song and produced a play based on it. Each of us played one of the characters. We spent a lot of time on this. We performed the play to the other women prisoners in both centres within the prison: Regina Coellys and Alborada. Alborada was a section of Buen Pastor but it was not part of the prison facility. Alborada housed women political prisoners too. »
[...]
« Unknown. Traditional Spanish children's song »
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Coplas of El Yopo (Coplas de El Yopo)

Author:
Unknown. Traditional Venezuelan song. Popularised in Chile by Isabel and Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Place & date:
« A comrade whose last name was Saavedra (if I recall correctly) sung this song passionately. This song earned him the nickname of ‘El Yopo’ (also ‘chopo’), as is usual in popular culture. The tune was well-known in Chile, as sung by Ángel and Isabel Parra, who called it "Décimas del folklore venezolano" or "Coplas Venezolanas". It was one of the most popular songs in prison and was performed at many of our musical events. It was also sung at Ritoque and Puchuncaví. »
[...]
« Unknown. Traditional Venezuelan song. Popularised in Chile by Isabel and Ángel Parra »
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Far Away (Tamo daleko)

Author:
Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916.
Testimony by:
Jorge Grez Leuquén
« Working as a documentary film-maker for some years, I recorded the stories of some of the prisoners during the dictatorship. It was during some of these sessions that the song 'Tamo Daleko' reappeared; it had been sung numerous times on Dawson Island. This is a humble contribution from the south of the south. »
[...]
« Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916. »
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Far Away (Tamo daleko)

Author:
Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916.
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« At Compingin Camp on the island, Mario started telling us about the Spanish lyrics of the Yugoslav song 'Tamo daleko'. The song was not Croatian: it was Serbian. It brought back many memories to the Yugoslav emigrants. This song was sung in the Río Chico camp on Dawson Island, which was an enormous, Nazi-style camp. »
[...]
« Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916. »
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We Shall Overcome

Author:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« On that occasion, our newly formed band (without a name) performed the following programme: "Soy del pueblo" (I am of the People) by Carlos Puebla; "El aparecido" (The Appeared) by Víctor Jara; "Los pueblos americanos" (The American Peoples) by Violeta Parra; "Vamos a Serchil" (Let's go to Serchil) by the Guatemalan Leopoldo Ramírez; "Del Norte vengo, Maruca" (I Come from the North, Maruca) by Ángel Parra (although some people say it was written by his mother); "Villancico nortino" (Northern Christmas Carol), a traditional song; and finally 'We Shall Overcome', written between 1950 and 1960 in the United States within the context of the Afro-American civil rights movement. In the prison we were acquainted with Joan Baez's version. We sang it in English and, of course, we explained its content and meaning. »
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From the Poplars I have Come, Mother (De los álamos vengo, madre)

Author:
Juan Vásquez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band created and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this traditional Spanish song at the Chacabuco concentration camp. »
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The Letter (La carta)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Place & date:
« We set up a band with a group of fellow prisoners. They were young, university students. One of them had a guitar. From what I remember, he was a music teacher and they allowed him to keep the instrument. In the band we also played the bombo and the charango. I accompanied by singing. »
[...]
« Sometimes evangelicals would come to say a prayer and sing traditional songs. That never appealed to me. »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Author:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Place & date:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« 'Se escucha muy lejos' (You Hear It from Far Away), was the title of the song. The lyrics and the music, driven by the instruments, gave life to a song that departed from the traditional music of the Chilean left of the time. Not meaning to equate us to them, I would say that our song was closer to the vanguard represented by bands such as Los Blops or Los Jaivas. The group we formed needed a name, which we borrowed from a star in the constellation of Orion, which glowed imposingly in the celestial equator on those summer nights. The group had a name: Bellatrix. »
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