174 results where found for «National Anthem of Chile»


Answer Me

Song by:
Gerhard Winkler and Fred Rauch. English lyrics by Carl Sigman. Recorded by Frankie Laine.
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« I sang this song alone in the National Stadium dressing rooms where I was held from September to November of 1973. This happened when the soldiers allowed artistic performances to take place in the converted dressing rooms while we waited our turn to be interrogated or after returning from interrogations. These were often torture sessions. »
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The Internationale

Song by:
Eugène Pottier (lyrics) and Pierre Degeyter (music). Popularised by Quilapayún in 1970s Chile.
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Experience in:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« In April 1975, the triumph in Vietnam was celebrated. We heard about it through a comrade who went to the bathroom and found a piece of the week’s newspaper. It was so beautiful for us to be there, having shouted so often for Vietnam at demonstrations. »
[...]
« So a group of prisoners from the Tower (*) decided to sing a bit from The Internationale. And we sang all together. We would coordinate through secret mail: for example, messages would be exchanged when someone went to the bathroom. The guards arrived and started shouting “what is happening here?”, kicking about. We managed to sing two or three verses. This was another example of music in conditions of extreme oppression. »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Song by:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Experience in:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« When the day arrived, before the audience, this music sounded innovative. When we finished our turn on stage, there was a massive applause and the jury decided that 'Se escucha muy lejos' should be the winner of the prize in the International Category. I can't quite remember - was it perhaps Luis Corvalán? At any rate, one of the miscreants, as we called the 'UP hierarchy' (Unidad Popular, that is, People's Unity), who were separated from us in the concentration camp but were allowed to take part in the cultural activities, was the person who presented us with the award: a medal made from a coin and displaying a seagull, Ritoque's Seagull. »
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Morning Has Broken

Song by:
Cat Stevens, based on a traditional Gaelic hymn; lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« At the time of the coup in 1973, this song was world-famous and frequently played on the radio. As transistor radios were quite small, many people were arrested with one of these in their pockets, and a significant number were not searched and confiscated by the military. This explains why, when we were in the National Stadium, we were able to listen to them, keep track of the news and listen to music. »
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Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Song by:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Experience in:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia Ovando, my sister Alejandra Ruiz and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« When visits were allowed to the detention centres, we would jump into the car and begin to sing 'El Pueblo Unido' (The people united), 'Venceremos' (We shall be victorious), 'El Tomate' (The tomato), 'The Internationale' and many other songs. We would sing right up until reaching the entrance of the place where the prisoners were held. The place I most remember is the Cochrane Navy barracks located by the Los Ciervos river. »
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We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Song by:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« I was studying to be a chemistry teacher at the University of Chile in La Serena. I was 21 years old when I was arrested. I think I was picked up due to a specific fact. I was regularly sent copies of the El Rebelde (The Rebel) newspaper by train, in order to distribute them in parts of Region IV. »
[...]
« We had a radio in the prison. I don’t know who brought it. We listened to national radio stations and at night to Radio Moscow. That’s how we found out about the things that were going on. It was a  radio shared by the whole prisoner community so we’d play music that we could all listen to. I wasn’t able to listen to the type of music I would have preferred at times, such as classical music. »
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To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
David Quintana García
Experience in:
« I spent 45 days in the torture centre of Intendencia de Rancagua. Previously, I was detained with my brothers in the headquarters of the Cuartel de Investigaciones de Rancagua. »
[...]
« I also played chess and was lucky to be with a fellow who was the national champion. We made a chessboard in the concrete and painted it with coffee. We made the figures with breadcrumbs. »
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Anthem of Puchuncaví (Himno de Puchuncaví)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« A few weeks before being transferred to Valparaíso Jail - where I would face a war council on account of alleged violations of the State Interior Security Law and other military regulations that existed during the state of siege - I wrote a song that I called anthem, because I wanted it to be sung as a group at the end of our cultural events on Fridays. The song was written so that every prisoner, regardless of political affiliation, could sing it. The only way to strengthen prisoners’ unity was to realise that all of us lived in the same conditions. »
[...]
« Anthem of Puchuncaví (Himno de Puchuncaví) »
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Everything Changes (Todo cambia)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My guitar accompanied me for the entire time that I was deprived of freedom. It was like a magnet. In the afternoon we would sing and play in the courtyard. »
[...]
« “Todo cambia” (“Everything changes”) was the anthem of the afternoons and was always sung. Everyone knew the song after a couple of months. It was like a timeout, everyone’s hope. »
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Lucky Devil (El suertúo)

Song by:
Víctor Canto and Luis Cifuentes (lyrics), Roberto Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This cueca* was composed at Chacabuco sometime between November 1973 and February 1974 and was sung by Los de Chacabuco, of which Víctor Canto and I were members. »
[...]
« This cueca was secretly recorded at Chacabuco by Alberto Corvalán Castillo, son of the Communist Party secretary-general Luis Corvalán, with assistance from Guillermo Orrego and Domingo Chávez. Alberto was to die in Bulgaria as a consequence of the torture to which he had been subjected at the National Stadium’s velodrome that caused him irreparable heart damage. »
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