235 results where found for «Neither Fish nor Fowl (Ni chicha ni limoná)»


Neither Fish nor Fowl (Ni chicha ni limoná)

Song by:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
Joaquín Vallejos
Experience in:
« I was arrested at home together with a childhood friend who they’d gone to pick up first. My family thought he’d stitched me up, which was not true. »
[...]
« Neither Fish nor Fowl (Ni chicha ni limoná) »
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Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Song by:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Experience in:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia, my sister Alejandra and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« We thought, thought, and thought, and suddenly it came to us. Neither Ale nor I could sing, but we thought it would be a lovely gift to sing 'Let's Break the Morning' for him. »
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Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Song by:
anonymous Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on 'Makhnovtchina', attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Experience in:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. »
[...]
« Neither pain nor sadness »
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South-Eastern Storm (La Sudestada)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Experience in:
« While I was in solitary confinement in Cuatro Álamos, one day I noticed there was a large room at the end of the corridor, which, overnight, the dinos(1) had filled with prisoners. »
[...]
« Neither old lovers nor beer »
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Futuristic Anthem (Himno futurista)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Patricio Polanco
Experience in:
« In 1973 and 1974, Pisagua was characterised by the harsh and cruel treatment of political prisoners. Singing was mandatory for prisoners, who were guarded by Army platoons, and it was also a means to avoid beatings and collective mistreatment. »
[...]
« neither will there be guards nor assassins »
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King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« 'Ñaca-ñaca' was an interjection we used at Camp Melinka whenever we wanted to signal and poke fun at any dark thought that might cross our minds. That may be why it seemed the ideal name to give to the paper maché puppet that played the role of the mean king in the puppet stories we performed to entertain the children who came to visit their captive fathers. »
[...]
« nor one as cruel, sinister, ugly and vain »
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King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
Experience in:
« During the last third of the 20th century, the concentration camps of the Chilean dictatorship were characterised by a high grade of organisation among prisoners, as well as the overflowing creativity they applied to all areas of human ingenuity. »
[...]
« nor one as cruel, sinister, ugly and vain »
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We Shall Overcome

Song by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« On that occasion, our newly formed band (without a name) performed the following programme: "Soy del pueblo" (I am of the People) by Carlos Puebla; "El aparecido" (The Appeared) by Víctor Jara; "Los pueblos americanos" (The American Peoples) by Violeta Parra; "Vamos a Serchil" (Let's go to Serchil) by the Guatemalan Leopoldo Ramírez; "Del Norte vengo, Maruca" (I Come from the North, Maruca) by Ángel Parra (although some people say it was written by his mother); "Villancico nortino" (Northern Christmas Carol), a traditional song; and finally 'We Shall Overcome', written between 1950 and 1960 in the United States within the context of the Afro-American civil rights movement. In the prison we were acquainted with Joan Baez's version. We sang it in English and, of course, we explained its content and meaning. »
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Captive Quena (Quena cautiva)

Song by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, September - December 1975
« I first laid my hands on a quena(1) when I was nine years old. It was resplendently fragile and lyrical. My passion for this instrument was immediate, or rather, the quena chose me. »
[...]
« Panpipes(2), charangos(3) and quenas went from being from the 'sonorous trinity' into the void of oblivion, prohibited for being subversive. »
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Las mañanitas

Song by:
Manuel M. Ponce
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, December 1974 - May 1976
« To every comrade who had a birthday, we would sing 'Las mañanitas' and we would give them presents. The majority of the female prisoners would come together and sing to you. I spent one birthday in prison. Birthdays were important for everyone because we were alive. Because you have a birthday when you’re alive. »
[...]
« Normally, we would sing when they locked us up in the barracks, from seven or eight at night until eight or nine in the morning. »
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