232 results where found for «Neither Fish nor Fowl (Ni chicha ni limoná)»


Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Author:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Place & date:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
[...]
« Some of those songs have remained in my memory as an indelible mark of those times, and on the whole I cannot or do not want to sing them. I would like to tell you about one of those songs, which I never knew what it was called nor its author, nor did I ever try to find out. It was taught to us by Cecilia Bojanic, a young 23 year-old woman who was a member of MIR (Movement of the Revolutionary Left) and who had been arrested together with her husband Flavio Oyarzún. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Author:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« We arrived at Dawson Island on the afternoon of 11 September. All we knew was that we had been arrested in the morning - nothing else. We arrived at the first detention camp, called Compingin. Music was with us all of the time on the island. First of all were the military songs we were forced to sing. If prisoners arrived from Pudeto, we had to sing that regiment’s anthem. We also had to learn the anthems of the Cochrane and Telecommunications regiments. The infantrymen would say, “here's the anthem, you have until the afternoon to learn it by heart.” »
[...]
« In Cochrane the marines were really ignorant about music. More than once Lanfranco sang “Te recuerdo Amanda” (I remember you, Amanda). The marines had no idea what they were listening to. »
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Chacabuco Mass (Misa chacabucana)

Author:
Ángel Parra and Ariel Ramírez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This song is the second track on the cassette recorded in the Chacabuco prison camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, formed by Ángel Parra and led by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had already been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group's conductor. »
[...]
« (*) Los Fronterizos: a folk band from the north of Argentina, active 1953-1977. Their collaboration with composer and pianist Ariel Ramírez on Misa Criolla was one of their enduring successes. »
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What Will the Holy Father Say (Qué dirá el Santo Padre)

Author:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Place & date:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We sang songs that were popular at the time. We’d sing "What will the Holy Father say," especially the part that says "What will the Holy Father who lives in Rome say ... they are slitting the throat of his dove..." quite often, for example when someone was taken off to Regimiento Arica, which was a torture centre. We would also sing "La golondrina" (The swallow), which was very symbolic, because even though we were imprisoned, we could "fly", our thoughts soaring beyond the prison walls... »
[...]
« To me music is everything in life; it's what gets me through each day. My mum played the piano, one of my brothers played the guitar. I don’t play any instrument, nor do I sing because I have a horrible voice. When I was studying primary education pedagogy a music teacher told me, "Cecilia, please don’t sing to the children". It is hard to conceive of a day without music. For me music is to spend all day with my headphones on, listening to different kinds of music. If I have to clean the house, I turn on the computer and search for something to listen to. It might occur to me to listen to Mercedes Sosa, or Quilapayún, or classical music, or something more cheerful. »
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Casida of the Dark Pigeons (Casida de las palomas oscuras)

Author:
Federico García Lorca (words), Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Place & date:
« According to scientists, memory and music processing are situated in a deep, ancestral part of the brain, where it is zealously guarded. Perhaps this explains why even after our bodies have been destroyed down to the bone marrow, when nothing is left of us but the murky eyes of death, music and song appear. »
[...]
« and the girl was neither. »
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With the Sprouts I Sowed (Y con brotes de mi siembra)

Author:
Andrés Rivanera (lyrics) and Eugenio Moglia (music). Popularized by Los Moros and Jorge Yáñez.
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« In Chacabuco there were two theatres: one that was very beautiful and was linked to the old saltpetre works, where it is claimed (wrongly as it happens) that Caruso once performed; and another theatre that was inside the concentration camp. At the latter venue, every Sunday night at about 8 o’clock, a show was performed with the sole participation of the political prisoners and in the presence of the camp’s guards, and at the express invitation of the Council of Elders, a body that represented the comrades in captivity. »
[...]
« drank black chicha »
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A finger-picked Cueca from a solidary companion (Cueca punteada de un solidario)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« It is true that the hard experience of torture and prison unified us and at times even generated strong ties of friendship among the prisoners. But, if we are being honest, we have to say that it was not all friendship and solidarity among the political prisoners. The left-wing political parties continued their ideological struggles inside the prisons, and, at worst, helped to deteriorate the already foul atmosphere of captivity. If the political constellation of the inmates was explosive, life inside a cell could become a psychological torment as bad or worse than the physical torture. Sectarianism and mistrust were common, and there were only few people with whom one could talk about personal issues, without fearing that the whole party would know about it the next day. Weaknesses were not tolerated. »
[...]
« Little fish in the fountain, »
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Reflections (Reflexiones)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Prison forced me to think quite a lot about my political past and my total commitment to an ideological cause, and its consequences. In this song (composed in the Puchuncaví Detention Camp and only sung for my friends and cellmates) I reflect on my role as a prisoner songwriter. »
[...]
« the fish is in a net, »
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Valparaíso

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« This song was written and sung in cell number 198 of Valparaíso’s former prison, that is to say, on the top floor of the main building, which was higher than the walls that surrounded it. This had several advantages for the prisoner, for if they perched on a stool to peer through the skylight, they could enjoy the company of a good part of the city during their hours of confinement. »
[...]
« the fisherman who sails out to sea, »
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A Million Friends (Un millón de amigos)

Author:
Roberto Carlos
Testimony by:
Pedro Mella Contreras
« I was arrested when I was 32 years old, along with approximately twenty-three other people. »
[...]
« And during the trip I will fish »
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