223 results where found for «Ni chicha ni limoná»


You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Song by:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Experience in:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« 'Se escucha muy lejos' (You Hear It from Far Away), was the title of the song. The lyrics and the music, driven by the instruments, gave life to a song that departed from the traditional music of the Chilean left of the time. Not meaning to equate us to them, I would say that our song was closer to the vanguard represented by bands such as Los Blops or Los Jaivas. The group we formed needed a name, which we borrowed from a star in the constellation of Orion, which glowed imposingly in the celestial equator on those summer nights. The group had a name: Bellatrix. »
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Zamba of my Hope (Zamba de mi esperanza)

Song by:
Luis H. Profili
Testimony by:
Edgardo Carabantes Olivares
« Horacio Carabantes Olivares, my brother, was locked up in January 1975 at the Maipo regiment of Valparaíso, with a large group of male and female prisoners, all arrested by the DINA. »
[...]
« Some of the survivors have told this story, stressing the significance of that action by Horacio, who in the midst of interrogation and torture did not lose his nerve but took the opportunity to give his comrades a sign of hope. »
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Lucía

Song by:
Joan Manuel Serrat
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, December 1974 - May 1976
« Tres Álamos was a more “normal” camp, even though we never had a trial. There was a lot of music, it was sort of ritualistic. There were days when we put more enthusiasm into it, on Saturdays or Sundays after the visits, although I’m not all that sure. »
[...]
« We would communicate with our companions who were one pavilion away. A kind of song-based dialogue was created. They would sing one thing and we would sing something else. Sometimes we would take off on our own flight and sing on our own. There was always a lot of singing. It was a collective act, of companionship and affection. We sang standing up, all connected like in an oval. It produced something with great connection and strength. »
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Las mañanitas

Song by:
Manuel M. Ponce
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, December 1974 - May 1976
« Normally we would sing when they locked us up in the barracks, from seven or eight at night until eight or nine in the morning. Sometimes the guards would come in but didn’t stay. It was our act. »
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Alfonsina and the Sea (Alfonsina y el mar)

Song by:
Félix Luna (lyrics) and Ariel Ramírez (music). Popularised by Mercedes Sosa.
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
Villa Grimaldi, January 1975
« It was not easy to endure being locked up in one of Villa Grimaldi’s miserable cells that resembled vertical coffins. It was even harderin the high temperatures of the summer months of the Andes foothills in Peñalolén. I was inside one of those cells, blindfolded, my feet and hands in chains. »
[...]
« All of a sudden, I heard the metal gate that separated us from the rest of the facility unexpectedly open and the guard asking who was singing. To avoid collective punishment, I knocked on the door from inside my “coffin cell” and identified myself as the singer. The guard, who I could not see, opened the cell door and stood in front of me. “Nice song,” he said. “Sing it again.” »
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Today Was Visitors’ Day (Hoy fue día de visitas)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« Visitors’ day was an exceptional day that broke the monotonous routine of all the other days of the week. I wrote this song in Valparaíso Jail, where I sang it countless times accompanied by my dearly remembered cellmate, the musician Antonio Suzarte from Valparaíso. »
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Lament for the Death of Augusto the Dog (Lamento a la muerte del perro Augusto)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Augusto the dog (not to be confused with the journalist Augusto Olivares, affectionately nicknamed "Augusto the Dog", who was murdered in the Presidential Palace on 11 September 1973), was the mascot of the political prisoners held at the Ritoque concentration camp, and accompanied his master when the military junta decided to close that prison and transfer the inmates to the neighbouring Puchuncaví concentration camp. »
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Beloved Friend (Amado amigo)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song, written in my cell at the Puchuncaví Prison Camp, speaks to a friend and fellow prisoner; it could be any one of the thousands behind bars. »
[...]
« Inside language (lenguaje amurallado): Quickly we realised that to circumvent the jailers’ censorship and to avoid punishment, we had to erase certain well-known expressions from our usual vocabulary and replace them with others, not yet understood by the oppressors. This adaptation process to the new conditions was set in motion once we won the right to organise our lives inside the prisons. The driving forces behind new images, new words, and new ways for describing reality were cultural, crafts and artistic activities. »
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Poet of Destiny (Poeta del destino)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« This song is a tribute to Miguel Enríquez, Secretary General of the Movement of the Revolutionary Left (MIR), who was gunned down by a commando of the dictatorship’s secret police on 5 October 1974. My own five-year militancy in that organisation resulted in my enormous respect for this individual. »
[...]
« The original text was created in the Capuchinos Prison (my last stop in Chile before leaving for exile in Germany), and underwent substantial changes in the early 1980s (which in my view enrich the composition) when I had the chance to read the moving speech given by Edgardo Enríquez, father of the political leader, at the opening ceremony of the Miguel Enríquez Clinical Hospital in Havana, Cuba. »
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The Brief Space Where You Are Absent (El breve espacio en que no estás)

Song by:
Pablo Milanés
Testimony by:
Vilma Rojas Toledo
Experience in:
Cárcel de Coronel, 1986 - 1988
« I recall that during my time as a political prisoner Pablo Milanés was one of our greatest companions. His songs filled us with life, helped us to keep breathing and living behind the bars imposed by Pinochet’s military dictatorship. Personally, I remember the song “El breve espacio en que no estás” (“The brief space where you are absent”) because it sparked such heated debate among my comrades that you would think we were trying to resolve a vital political issue. »
[...]
« We never reached an agreement, yet we discussed it with all the seriousness that great song deserved. It was one of those beautiful moments of humanity shared with other women, my companions in prison. It made you feel that the songs we listened to on a cassette player contained the wisdom and spirit of rebellion, which I personally needed in order to feel that they had not completely deprived me of my freedom. »
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