223 results where found for «Ni chicha ni limoná»


King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« “Ñaca-ñaca” was an interjection we used at Camp Melinka whenever we wanted to signal and poke fun at any dark thought that might crossed our minds. That may be why it seemed the ideal name to give to the papier maché puppet that played the role of the mean king in the puppet stories we performed to entertain the children who came to visit their captive fathers. But Ñaca-Ñaca’s important role was more than that. The paper model was borrowed to perform the 'star role' in one of the cultural events we customarily staged every Friday. Events which, it should be pointed out, were attended only by captives and armed guards. It was a “Prisoners’ Show”, full of fantasy. »
[...]
« Ñaca-Ñaca  - the puppet - in his role as mean king, was certainly a third-class king, a dictator who enjoyed ridiculing his prisoners. These were none other than: Cinturón de Lana (Woolen Belt), Anillo de Metal (Metal Ring), Huesito (Little Bone) and Caballito de Mar (Seahorse). These were all allegorical figures that had great meaning for us as prime examples of the handicraft that came from the hands of our fellow prisoners. In this play Ñaca-Ñaca’s guards – his soldiers – were the Puínes, which directly alluded to the barbed wire. It would have been difficult to make it any clearer: what we were doing was a staged and metaphorical enactment of our own story. And we did it with a good measure of optimism, as shown in the fact that at the end Ñaca-Ñaca loses his voice – that is, his power - and he loses his mind. Thus the captives become free. »
[Read full testimony]

National Anthem of Chile

Song by:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« The Puchuncaví Prisoners Camp had a daily routine similar to that of military regiments. In a ridiculous ceremony, the flag was raised every morning at dawn and then it was taken down at nightfall. »
[Read full testimony]

Go Tell It to the Rain (Ve y díselo a la lluvia)

Song by:
Clan 91
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« We had a comrade who sang beautifully. He was called Peye and was a student at the State Technical University. I’d never met him before but later we becamoe great friends in the Compingin Camp on the island. »
[Read full testimony]

Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
[...]
« In cell 3 there were generally 11 or 12 of us, and we’d spend the day sitting two or three at a time on each of the bunk beds. A significant part of our exchanges were through singing, which could not be too loud as this could incur the guards’ wrath and lead to subsequent punishment. So we sang almost in whispers. »
[Read full testimony]

Oh Saving Victim (O salutaris Hostia)

Song by:
text by Saint Thomas Aquinas; music by Lorenzo Perosi
Testimony by:
Roberto Navarrete
Experience in:
Cárcel de Santiago, November 1973 - April 1974
« The political prisoners’ cell block in Santiago Prison was established when they transferred many people from the National Stadium in October or November 1973. I was first held in the Stadium. I was 18 when they arrested me. »
[...]
« The public activities we undertook in the prison included playing football, chess, table tennis and a range of training workshops. There was a choir. I don’t remember exactly when or how it was formed. Most of the choir members were much older than me. Its director was a political prisoner and had been a deacon in his youth. The choir sounded nice. »
[Read full testimony]

National Anthem of Chile

Song by:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« We arrived at Dawson Island on the afternoon of 11 September. All we knew was that we had been arrested in the morning - nothing else. We arrived at the first detention camp, called Compingin. Music was with us all of the time on the island. First of all were the military songs we were forced to sing. If prisoners arrived from Pudeto, we had to sing that regiment’s anthem. We also had to learn the anthems of the Cochrane and Telecommunications regiments. The infantrymen would say, “here's the anthem, you have until the afternoon to learn it by heart.” »
[Read full testimony]

Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Song by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
« Once upon a time there was a good little wolf. … No. That’s another story. »
[...]
« Once upon a time there was a political prisoner in Chile. This one was a very badly behaved prisoner. He had been the protagonist of – and punished for – an escape attempt (it was only a misunderstanding) and a doctors’ strike (he was a physician) among other misdemeanours. Arturo and him were in charge of updating and showing a map of Vietnam to their comrades , keeping them informed of the progress of the liberation. »
[Read full testimony]

Christmas Oratorio According to St. Luke (Oratorio de Navidad según San Lucas)

Song by:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This is the first song on the cassette recorded at the Chacabuco camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, created by Ángel Parra and conducted by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group’s conductor. »
[...]
« Those taking part are named at the beginning of the recording. All ten members of the group took part. The colour photo displayed in other testimonies on the Cantos Cautivos archive shows nine of us, while Antonio was left out due to a framing error. Antonio does appear, along with the rest of the group, in the black-and-white photo included here [in the movie]. »
[Read full testimony]

The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Song by:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado
« I arrived at Tres Álamos on the eve of the departure for Mexico of a large group of prisoners. The group included Dr. Ipinza, who before leaving entrusted me with the job of physician, the medicine donated by the Red Cross, and his position in the Council of Elders. At 28 years of age, I found this title odd but also understandable, in light of the social esteem with which all tribes regard their healers. This tale has its origins there, as does a famous doctors’ strike, but that is another story. »
[...]
« I was next and I didn’t pass up the opportunity to be as offensive as I was able to be in such situations. After all, I knew the punishment would come regardless. When the slaps in the face began, I was on guard and could handle them without problems. Then it was Toluca’s turn. This comrade was of very slight build; he cannot have weighed more than sixty kilos. All along, he had had plenty of time to plan his performance. When the cop dealt his first punch, Toluca flew over the desk, sweeping away everything in his path, and destroying the big typewriter that had stood there. Through the open door, which had been left open, I could see Toluca flat on his back in a corner, in the middle of all the debris, and he was saying to Pacheco, “What a mighty right hook, Commander!” while the police officer stupidly gazed at his own fist and the damage it had caused, trying to fathom how he had caused such destruction. »
[Read full testimony]

We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Song by:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« I was studying to be a chemistry teacher at the University of Chile in La Serena. I was 21 years old when I was arrested. I think I was picked up due to a specific fact. I was regularly sent copies of the El Rebelde (The Rebel) newspaper by train, in order to distribute them in parts of Region IV. »
[...]
« We had a radio in the prison. I don’t know who brought it. We listened to national radio stations and at night to Radio Moscow. That’s how we found out about the things that were going on. It was a  radio shared by the whole prisoner community so we’d play music that we could all listen to. I wasn’t able to listen to the type of music I would have preferred at times, such as classical music. »
[Read full testimony]