223 results where found for «Ni chicha ni limoná»


Dona Nobis Pacem

Song by:
Text from Agnus Dei (Roman Catholic Mass); music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Experience in:
« Music was always present in my family. My dad played the violin and my mum the piano. When I was a child, my mum sent us to dance and piano lessons. I also learnt at the Evangelical Church and sang on the radio. My husband Mario played the guitar very well and had a wonderful tenor voice. We made a good duo. I could find the second voice for any bolero. »
[...]
« In Buen Pastor, I would see the girls with teary eyes. They pretended to be strong but then they would go watch television series. It was an opportunity to cry. I thought: “I will teach them to sing a bit”. With a few fellow prisoners we created a choir. We found an old guitar, full of scratches, and although it had poor strings, it still made a sound. We rehearsed a number of songs. But at night my fingertips would hurt so much that I had to dip them in cold water to relieve the pain. It was like a burn. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
« We were in Pavilion 1. One of us came up with the idea, I can’t remember who. There were so many of us and we spent the day inventing and creating things! »
[...]
« Then we see the guys running out with tables, benches, seats, and sitting down to see us play. They tuned charangos, drums and guitars and began singing, singing to us at the top of their voices. Over a hundred prisoners singing in unison. It was stirring. »
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Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Song by:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of “lack of evidence”, after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« I see memory as an exercise to give new meanings to the past. As the years go by you give it a different meaning or understand it differently. »
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Everything Changes (Todo cambia)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My guitar accompanied me for the entire time that I was deprived of freedom. It was like a magnet. In the afternoon we would sing and play in the courtyard. »
[...]
« There was a very friendly young guard who would let us into the courtyard when she was on night shift. We would play cards, sing and look at the moon. The guard liked trova* music and listening to me sing. »
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Little Doctors (Doctorcitos)

Song by:
Unknown. Folk tune from the Andes highlands
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« In 1974 - I don’t quite remember the month - the Chacabuco Olympics were held. The opening ceremony consisted of symbolically carrying the Olympic torch through the concentration camp. »
[...]
« There was a tremendous uproar, and the march left from the corner of our house at number 26, pavilion 5, next to our University, in the middle of the Civic District. The fervour grew as we were all running next to El Tigre and reached another pavilion after a few laps around the Olympic course. »
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To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
David Quintana García
Experience in:
« I spent 45 days in the torture centre of Intendencia de Rancagua. Previously, I was detained with my brothers in the headquarters of the Cuartel de Investigaciones de Rancagua. »
[...]
« Those songs were linked to our actions during the Unidad Popular. With the university groups, we did lots of voluntary work, in the settlements and in the countryside. We also performed plays. I always acted in them. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Song by:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Experience in:
« The political prisoners organised mate-drinking gatherings once or twice a week, during which we did poetry and sang songs, amongst them ‘El cautivo de Til Til’ by Patricio Manns, ‘Samba Landó’ and ‘Vuelvo’ by Inti-Illimani, ‘Valparaíso’ by Osvaldo ‘Gitano’ Rodríguez, and songs by Eduardo ‘Gato’ Alquinta and Silvio Rodríguez. »
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How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos)

Song by:
Unknown. Popularised by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Scarlett Mathieu
« In Cuatro Álamos, I was profoundly marked by the singing of a current detained-disappeared named Juan Chacón. He sang ‘En qué nos parecemos’, a love song from the Spanish Civil War. It remained engraved in me because that comrade disappeared from Cuatro Álamos. »
[...]
« It was important to recognise voices because we were blindfolded and our communication happened in the dark. One could only meet up with the people with whom one shared the cell. »
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Moments (Los momentos)

Song by:
Eduardo Gatti
Testimony by:
Scarlett Mathieu
« ‘Moments’ was a song sung by the female comrades whose partners were imprisoned on the other side of Tres Álamos, or were fugitives or disappeared. We all sang it, but it was like their anthem. »
[...]
« We all sang, those who sang well and those who sang badly. It was something that created great communion. We became 110 people. It was very significant for men to hear us sing. They sang softly or sang badly. »
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The Clock (El reloj)

Song by:
Roberto Cantoral
Testimony by:
Ana María Arenas
« The day I was captured, after the first torture session, I asked for permission to sing a Christmas carol, the name of which I cannot remember. I did it to let one of my captive friends know that I was also at the Venda Sexy. »
[...]
« Before being imprisoned, my friend and I rehearsed this Christmas carol in the Coro Mozart, where we sang. This choir was an amalgamation of members of the Coro de Cámara of the Universities of Chile, the Católica and the Técnica del Estado. »
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