225 results where found for «Ni chicha ni limon��»


Oh Saving Victim (O salutaris Hostia)

Music piece by:
text by Saint Thomas Aquinas; music by Lorenzo Perosi
Testimony by:
Roberto Navarrete
Detention in:
Cárcel de Santiago, November 1973 - April 1974
« The political prisoners’ cell block in Santiago Prison was established when they transferred many people from the National Stadium in October or November 1973. »
[...]
« The public activities we undertook in the prison included playing football, chess, table tennis and a range of training workshops. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Music piece by:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
Detention in:
« We arrived at Dawson Island on the afternoon of 11 September. All we knew was that we had been arrested in the morning - nothing else. »
[...]
« When we were in Compingin, one morning at dawn a group of ministers and senators were brought in from Santiago. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Music piece by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
« Once upon a time, there was a good little wolf. … No. That’s another story. »
[...]
« Once upon a time, there was a political prisoner in Chile. This one was a very badly behaved prisoner. He had been the protagonist of – and punished for – an escape attempt (it was only a misunderstanding) and a doctors’ strike (he was a physician) among other misdemeanours. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Music piece by:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado
« I arrived at Tres Álamos on the eve of the departure for Mexico with a large group of prisoners. The group included Dr. Ipinza, who before leaving entrusted me with the job of physician, the medicine donated by the Red Cross, and his position in the Council of Elders. »
[...]
« I was next and I didn’t pass up the opportunity to be as offensive as I was able to be in such situations. After all, I knew the punishment would come regardless. When the slaps in the face began, I was on guard and could handle them without problems. Then it was Toluca’s turn. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Music piece by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
« We were in Pavilion 1. One of us came up with the idea, I can’t remember who. There were so many of us and we spent the day inventing and creating things! »
[...]
« Then we see the guys running out with tables, benches, seats, and sitting down to see us play. They tuned charangos, bombos and guitars and began singing, singing to us at the top of their voices. Over a hundred prisoners singing in unison. It was stirring. »
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Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Music piece by:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Detention in:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of 'lack of evidence', after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« I see memory as an exercise to give new meanings to the past. As the years go by you give it a different meaning or understand it differently. »
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Everything Changes (Todo cambia)

Music piece by:
Julio Numhauser
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Detention in:
« My guitar accompanied me for the entire time that I was deprived of freedom. It was like a magnet. In the afternoon we would sing and play in the courtyard. »
[...]
« There was a very friendly young guard who would let us into the courtyard when she was on a night shift. We would play cards, sing and look at the moon. The guard liked trova music and listening to me sing. »
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Little Doctors (Doctorcitos)

Music piece by:
Unknown. Folk tune from the Andes highlands
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego
« In 1974 - I don’t quite remember the month - the Chacabuco Olympics were held. The opening ceremony consisted of symbolically carrying the Olympic torch through the concentration camp. »
[...]
« There was a tremendous uproar, and the march left from the corner of our house at number 26, pavilion 5, next to our University, in the middle of the Civic District. The fervour grew as we were all running next to El Tigre and reached another pavilion after a few laps around the Olympic course. »
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To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Music piece by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
David Quintana García
Detention in:
« I spent 45 days in the torture centre of Intendencia de Rancagua. Previously, I was detained with my brothers in the headquarters of the Cuartel de Investigaciones de Rancagua. »
[...]
« When we were detained, listening to the music of the Unidad Popular took us back to the times during which we were together with the people. Those memories lifted our spirits. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Music piece by:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Detention in:
« The political prisoners organised mateadas once or twice a week, during which we did poetry and sang songs, amongst them ‘El cautivo de Til Til’ by Patricio Manns, ‘Samba Landó’ and ‘Vuelvo’ by Inti-Illimani, ‘Valparaíso’ by Osvaldo ‘Gitano’ Rodríguez, and songs by Eduardo ‘Gato’ Alquinta and Silvio Rodríguez. »
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