367 results where found for «Por qué llora la tarde»


Future (Futuro)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« The dream of the political prisoner was to regain freedom. All of us would feel joy when one of us was about to be released from prison, although it far from easy to see a comrade depart. Even less so for those who suspected they would never enjoy that privilege. »
[...]
« It was my turn to experience that heady phase of "mapping out a future while still a prisoner" between September and November 1976. The first time was in the former Valparaiso Jail, and then it was in Santiago, in the Capuchins' Jail. At the time I understood that my road to freedom would be a bit longer than that of the comrades who simply walked out the prison gates. My prison sentence had been commuted to deportation from Chile. Exile. In other words, I would have to board a plane and fly several hours before landing in freedom. »
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Song of a Middle-Class Man (Canción de un hombre medio)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« In our political discussions, we always spoke disdainfully of the middle class. In the view of the Marxist ideologues in prison, that sector of society supported the dictatorship and it was necessary to reverse that trend. It was not an active support but rather a passive support that involved laying low and getting by with the dictatorship. »
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Go Tell It to the Rain (Ve y díselo a la lluvia)

Author:
Clan 91
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« We had a comrade who sang beautifully. He was called Peye and was a student at the State Technical University. I’d never met him before but later we becamoe great friends in the Compingin Camp on the island. »
[...]
« Music was very important on Dawson Island. People would sing in the evenings, especially Argentinian folk songs and everything that we wrote. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Author:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Place & date:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
[...]
« I seem to remember that once, she returned from the bathroom very happy because she’d heard someone whistling the same song and thought it was Flavio answering back. Back in our cell we’d whisper this song as a way to support her when she was feeling sad, and also to send strength to Flavio, even though he couldn’t hear our voices. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Author:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
Eliseo González
Place & date:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« Jorge Peña Hen was in solitary confinement that day. I don’t know how, but someone brought him matches. With his saliva, he made ink from the phosphorus tips, which he then used to write a score of music on a scrap of paper. »
[...]
« They had been arrested while posing for photos for the cover of their new record. The place where they were arrested was adjacent to the petroleum tanks in the port district, near the ships in Guayacán or La Herradura Bay. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Author:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
« We were in Pavilion 1. One of us came up with the idea, I can’t remember who. There were so many of us and we spent the day inventing and creating things! »
[...]
« But the most important thing: from a corner of the court, also, you could see, sideways, the windows of Cuatro Álamos and our imprisoned comrades hanging their hands and feet out as far as they could between the window bars. Those in this pavilion would either become prisoners or become part of the long lines of comrades who are detained-disappeared to this day. »
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Recinto: Destructor Transporte Orella
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If you had a musical experience in this detention centre, please share it here!

Recinto: Comisaría de Carabineros Nº 1, San Fernando (Conocida también como la Prefectura de Colchagua por funcionar en las mismas dependencias )
There are no testimonies in this detention centre.
If you had a musical experience in this detention centre, please share it here!

Mid-Afternoon Love (Amor de media tarde)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« This song is dedicated to Graciela Navarro, who managed to made my prisoner's life more beautiful on the days we were allowed to receive visitors. During the week, when the hourly monotony became unbearable, she would use her free moments to deliver roses and brief love letters for me at the prison gate. »
[...]
« Mid-Afternoon Love (Amor de media tarde) »
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How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos)

Author:
Unknown. Popularised by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
« During the 1960s the band Quilapayún popularised this old Spanish song in Chile. Víctor Canto and I performed it as a duet in Santiago’s National Stadium - which had been converted into a concentration, torture and extermination camp - from September to November 1973. Whenever the military allowed us to do so, we would sing it in the locker rooms where we slept, and in the grandstands where we spent much of the day. »
[...]
« How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos) »
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