477 results where found for «Qué dirá el Santo Padre»


Three Indian Songs (Tres canciones indias)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« After our transfer from Tres Álamos to Puchuncaví in April 1975, a group of prisoners began toying with the idea of presenting a poetic-theatrical performance about the history of Latin America’s indigenous cultures and their extermination under Iberian domination. I joined the group offering my services as songwriter and performer, and was received with open arms. »
[...]
« Paprika for my queen, »
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Barlovento

Song by:
Eduardo Serrano
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January – February 1974
« This is one of the songs the band Los de Chacabuco arranged and performed at the weekly show authorised by the military. »
[...]
« Let the conuqueros come »
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From the Poplars I have Come, Mother (De los álamos vengo, madre)

Song by:
Juan Vásquez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band created and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this traditional Spanish song at the Chacabuco concentration camp. »
[...]
« Juan Vásquez »
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Valparaíso

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« This song was written and sung in cell number 198 of Valparaíso’s former prison, that is to say, on the top floor of the main building, which was higher than the walls that surrounded it. This had several advantages for the prisoner, for if they perched on a stool to peer through the skylight, they could enjoy the company of a good part of the city during their hours of confinement. »
[...]
« an opaque fire and a fog. »
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The Man Who Transformed into an Animal (El hombre que se convirtió en animal)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« I wrote this song shortly after reading Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis, one of the books that circulated in Camp Melinka from hand to hand and cabin to cabin. »
[...]
« who was a sharp and eloquent man. »
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Zamba so as Not to Die (Zamba para no morir)

Song by:
Hamlet Lima Quintana
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Experience in:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« I want to recall a night at Villa Grimaldi. »
[...]
« Forgetfulness cannot conquer me »
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Gigi the Ladies’ Man (Gigi l’amoroso)

Song by:
Jacqueline Misrahi, Lana Sebastian and Paul Sebastian. Popularised by Dalida.
Testimony by:
Eduardo René Cuevas
« This song was used while the Military Intelligence Service (SIM) subjected me to cruel torture at a clandestine torture centre in the southern Chilean city of Los Ángeles. »
[...]
« Jacqueline Misrahi, Lana Sebastian and Paul Sebastian. Popularised by Dalida. »
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Oh Saving Victim (O salutaris Hostia)

Song by:
text by Saint Thomas Aquinas; music by Lorenzo Perosi
Testimony by:
Roberto Navarrete
Experience in:
Cárcel de Santiago, November 1973 - April 1974
« The political prisoners’ cell block in Santiago Prison was established when they transferred many people from the National Stadium in October or November 1973. I was first held in the Stadium. I was 18 when they arrested me. »
[...]
« Uni trinoque Domino »
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Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde)

Song by:
Antônio Marcos. Popularised in Chile by Claudio Reyes
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« My prison term happened during the last year of the dictatorship after the No vote won. I was set free because of “lack of evidence”, after a year and a half in prison. »
[...]
« Why does the afternoon cry (Por qué llora la tarde) »
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We Shall Overcome

Song by:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« These performances were divided in two parts, each lasting around 40 minutes. In one we presented the "Cantata of Santa María de Iquique", but that's another story. With a smaller group, which we called The Hard-boiled Eggs (I still have no idea where that name came from or how we chose it), we presented a show every other Sunday at noon. There we’d accompany anyone who wanted to sing a song of their choice. But that, too, is another story. »
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