382 results where found for «Que la tortilla se vuelva»


Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Place & date:
« I’m from Chol Chol, part of the Coihue community. I was arrested along with twelve other people and they took us to the Second Police Station of Temuco. I was 30 years old. It was a week before I was due to get married. »
[...]
« Before getting to the prison of Temuco, they took me in a car to a place that appears to have been the Puente Viejo (Old Bridge) over the river Cautín. I could hear the train passing and the noise of the water. »
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Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Marianella Ubilla
« I was taken prisoner on 23 November 1973, at the University of Concepción. In the Regional Stadium of Concepción we had to sing the National Anthem every day. They’d always play military marching music. I think they did that to show that they were the bosses. »
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Three white lilies (Tres blancos lirios)

Author:
Unknown composer. This song probably relates to European early-years pedagogy.
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
Place & date:
« They arrested me at my workplace in October 1973 . I was 31 years old and worked as a porter at a logging business in Chumpullo, near Valdivia. »
[...]
« The prison had four floors. It was meant for 400 people but there were 1400. We were piled up. I was on the second floor with other political prisoners. I was lucky to land there. There were other lumberjacks, teachers and intellectuals. I also met a seminarian that I knew from when I studied in the seminary. »
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The Wall (La muralla)

Author:
Nicolás Guillén (lyrics) and Quilapayún (music)
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
« In prison, there was a guy who played the guitar. He cheered up the afternoons in the cell. We all sang with him. »
[...]
« I separated from my wife a year after being imprisoned. One time when we were reunited we remembered the songs from the prison, especially “Tres blancos lirios” and “Arrorró”. These were terrible times. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Author:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« I was detained in Panguipulli on 24 September 1973, along with 17 other young people. I was a high school student. I was also working at the forestry and logging company of Huilo Huilo, which had been taken over by the working class. We were tortured for two or three days at the police station of Panguipulli. They left me unconscious. »
[...]
« Then they took us to a police station in Valdivia. In the stables they took our names and addresses, and then sent us to the prison on Teja Island. In the prison, one of the prisoners spent night and day in a dungeon. Despite being in solitary confinement, he would open his window and sing the National Anthem at full blast. We all went outside to have a look, even the guards. The prisoner didn’t sing the verse about the brave soldiers, out of protest I imagine. He sang for about four days. After that we heard nothing more about him. »
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Fifth Symphony

Author:
Ludwig van Beethoven
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« I like all classical music, particularly Beethoven and Mozart. I listen to it all day on Radio Esperanza, on the bus I drive. The passengers like it. But listening to classical music reminds of what happened in prison and it produces a short circuit in me. »
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Luchín

Author:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« They said that once you got to the prison of Teja Island, you were safe. However, once when we were in our cells, they shot several young people who were between 18 and 21 years old. When I saw their pictures I asked myself why I hadn’t been among them. »
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Sinner, come to sweet Jesus (Pecador, ven al dulce Jesús)

Author:
Unknown
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« One time a group of male and female evangelicals came to Teja Island to preach. They were taken to the visitors’ yard. Because we prisoners had nothing else to do, we went to see them. »
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Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Author:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Place & date:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia Ovando, my sister Alejandra Ruiz and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« Later on, when my father was released from prison and sent to internal exile in Castro, Chiloé, we travelled with him. It was then that he told us that there were songs that had also been important for prisoners, and he taught us several of them. »
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You Can Blame Me (Échame a mí la culpa)

Author:
José Ángel Espinoza, aka Ferrusquillo
Testimony by:
Marcia Scantlebury
« Mexican songs - and this one in particular - have always moved me. When I shared a cell with Miriam Silva, a young woman who belonged to the Communist Youth, arrested by the DINA when she was handing out leaflets on the street, we killed time in an organised fashion to keep ourselves from getting depressed and overcome by anxiety due to an unknown fate. »
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