28 results where found for «Return, Return, Return (Volver, volver, volver)»


Beloved Friend (Amado amigo)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song, written in my cell at the Puchuncaví Prison Camp, speaks to a friend and fellow prisoner; it could be any one of the thousands behind bars. »
[...]
« Paper boat (barco de papel): We had a habit of wishing farewell to our comrades who were released or about to be transferred to other prisons. People who were not fortunate enough to be included in the group would gather around those who were about to leave, a ritual that sometimes included singing Julio Numhausser’s beautiful song “El barco de papel”. The first verse goes like this: “Se va el barco de papel por el mar de la esperanza, llevando un montón de sueños y los niños no lo alcanzan. Se va, se va y no volverá. Se va, se va a la libertad. (The paper boat sails to a sea of hope, carrying dreams and children can’t reach it. There it goes, there it goes, and it will never return. There it goes, there it goes to freedom.”). »
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Free (Libre)

Song by:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Experience in:
« I’m from Chol Chol, part of the Coihue community. I was arrested along with twelve other people and they took us to the Second Police Station of Temuco. I was 30 years old. It was a week before I was due to get married. »
[...]
« I was imprisoned for five years. I couldn’t go into exile because the politicians said that I was a "mapuchito". They pulled the chair from under me. But because I’m a mapuche I returned to my community. »
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To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Gabriela Durand
« I was 18, and already I had been tortured on the rack several times. One day I was with some other comrade prisoners, and as sometimes happened, the guards put some music on. They used to put the radio on, playing popular tunes of the time. For us young people, the songs were a bit corny, but still we enjoyed them; they were a relief. We always kept absolute silence. »
[...]
« I was sitting down, handcuffed, and at some point the song “Volver a los diecisiete” (Return to seventeen) came on; I don’t know if it was the radio or a record being played. A guard came up to me, pulled me up and said: "Look, girl, listen to this song, it’s yours, you revolutionaries; let’s see, sing it!" I told him I couldn’t sing and he said "Yes you can - sing to your comrades, they’re all feeling screwed." »
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Go Tell It to the Rain (Ve y díselo a la lluvia)

Song by:
Clan 91
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« We had a comrade who sang beautifully. He was called Peye and was a student at the State Technical University. I’d never met him before but later we becamoe great friends in the Compingin Camp on the island. »
[...]
« We formed a group called Alpha 4, specialising in more modern songs, mainly rock songs. We played some tremendous shows. It was really nice because when we returned to the barracks, we felt like true musicians. Peye wrote a song. I remember that he showed it to me. It was written with the Viña del Mar Song Festival in mind. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA secret police, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos, and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
[...]
« I seem to remember that once, she returned from the bathroom very happy because she’d heard someone whistling the same song and thought it was Flavio answering back. Back in our cell we’d whisper this song as a way to support her when she was feeling sad, and also to send strength to Flavio, even though he couldn’t hear our voices. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Song by:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado
« I arrived at Tres Álamos on the eve of the departure for Mexico of a large group of prisoners. The group included Dr. Ipinza, who before leaving entrusted me with the job of physician, the medicine donated by the Red Cross, and his position in the Council of Elders. At 28 years of age, I found this title odd but also understandable, in light of the social esteem with which all tribes regard their healers. This tale has its origins there, as does a famous doctors’ strike, but that is another story. »
[...]
« As it happens, it was as I returned from Villa Grimaldi after this episode, as I went through the obligatory transition at Cuatro Álamos, that one day I opened the window and in came Beethoven. Around that time one of the guys from MIR, who had taken part in the famous televised press conference calling on everyone to lay down their arms, was in a neighbouring cell, held with his girlfriend. This young woman had the most beautiful voice. Every evening, at sunset, she would sing, and always a different song, for all the rest of us prisoners. We were never able to see her, yet we will remember her forever. »
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I Come Back (Vuelvo)

Song by:
Patricio Manns (lyrics) and Horacio Salinas (music)
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Experience in:
« During our mate-drinking gatherings in the Prison of Santiago, we always talked about the song ‘Vuelvo’. It gave you the hope of returning to the fight. The prison was only something temporary. »
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The Apparition (El aparecido)

Song by:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
Pedro Mella Contreras
« When they took me out to physiotherapy treatment, I sang some verses of the song ‘The Apparition’ loudly: »
[...]
« When I listen to these songs now, I return to that time. These are things that happened to us, and we have always said that memory is alive. »
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