327 results where found for «Scende la pioggia»


La López Pereyra

Song by:
Artidorio Cresseri
Testimony by:
Germán Larrabe
« This Argentine zamba* was the first song we tried to perform in Puchuncaví, with a group made up of prisoners transferred from Chacabuco Detention Camp together with us, newly arrived 'Puchuncas'. »
[...]
« contemplating the stars, I asked the loveliest of them »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Experience in:
« One of the most important songs in the detention centres. Impossible to count how many times we sang it. Every time someone was released from a detention camp or there was credible information that a person would be sent into exile, a gigantic chorus would sing this song, in a powerful unison. No one could possibly forget it. Especially significant at Tres Álamos, as this was the “exit” camp. »
[...]
« Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios. »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios.
Testimony by:
José Selín Carrasco Vargas
« While we were imprisoned in Melinka, this song was sung every time that one of us was released. I remember a fellow prisoner nicknamed Bigote Molina (Moustache Molina) singing the song when we were going to Tres Álamos, from where we would be released a few days later. »
[...]
« Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios. »
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Morning Has Broken

Song by:
Cat Stevens, based on a traditional Gaelic hymn; lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« At the time of the coup in 1973, this song was world-famous and frequently played on the radio. As transistor radios were quite small, many people were arrested with one of these in their pockets, and a significant number were not searched and confiscated by the military. This explains why, when we were in the National Stadium, we were able to listen to them, keep track of the news and listen to music. »
[...]
« Blackbird has spoken like the first bird »
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Love (Amor)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely (music); Guillermo Núñez (lyrics)
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song is based on a poem Guillermo wrote in the Puchuncaví Prison Camp dedicated to his partner Soledad. Of all the songs I composed as a prisoner, this is the only one where the lyrics are not mine. The reason is very human and simple. One day Guillermo asked me if I could set to music verses he had written so he could sing them to his beloved the next time she visited him. I found the idea so original and I liked it so much that I decided to help him. I took the sheet of paper with the poem to my cell in one of the adjacent huts. After reading and re-reading it several times, I began to compose this song. It’s a shame, but I don’t recall if Soledad ever got a chance to hear it. »
[...]
« that grows and becomes larger »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Song by:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Experience in:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« who laughing kick over sand castles. »
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I’m Not from Here - To my Comrade, my Love (No soy de aquí - A mi compañera)

Song by:
Facundo Cabral, with lyrics modified by a political prisoner
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
Experience in:
« The choir of male prisoners sang a piece called “A mi compañera” (To my comrade, my love) to the music of “No soy de aquí, ni soy de al” (I'm not from here, nor from there) by Facundo Cabral. I don’t remember who wrote the lyrics. But that’s how I wrote it down in one of the ten notebooks I used to copy songs during my imprisonment. »
[...]
« and I contemplate your figure like a blade of grass »
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Three Mountaineers (Eran tres alpinos)

Song by:
Unknown. Traditional Spanish children's song
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We adapted this song and produced a play based on it. Each of us played one of the characters. We spent a lot of time on this. We performed the play to the other women prisoners in both centres within the prison: Regina Coellys and Alborada. Alborada was a section of Buen Pastor but it was not part of the prison facility. Alborada housed women political prisoners too. »
[...]
« and tia tai, rataplan, coming home from war. »
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The Black King (El rey negro)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« One cold winter night of 1975, the small clinic of Melinka, in the Puchuncaví Detention Camp, became the setting for a touching story. »
[...]
« there was a black king in the land. »
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Sinner, come to sweet Jesus (Pecador, ven al dulce Jesús)

Song by:
Unknown
Testimony by:
anónimo
Experience in:
« One time a group of male and female evangelicals came to Teja Island to preach. They were taken to the visitors’ yard. Because we prisoners had nothing else to do, we went to see them. »
[...]
« Lamb that left the flock »
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