155 results where found for «The Little Fence»


To my Little Dove (A mi palomita)

Music piece by:
Teófilo Vargas Candia, popularised in Chile by the group Quilapayún
Testimony by:
David Quintana García
Experience in:
Cárcel de Rancagua, 1974 - 1975
« On 10 September 1974, a folk band of Communist Youth activists arrived at the prison of Rancagua. They were arrested to prevent them from participating in the demonstrations and other acts against the dictatorship on 11 September through their role as musicians and activists. They were freed on the 12th. They were arrested again in September 1975. »
[...]
« My little dove has been stolen »
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A Million Friends (Un millón de amigos)

Music piece by:
Roberto Carlos
Testimony by:
Pedro Mella Contreras
« I was arrested when I was 32 years old, along with approximately 23 other people. »
[...]
« I want a choir of little birds. »
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Zamba so as Not to Die (Zamba para no morir)

Music piece by:
Hamlet Lima Quintana
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Experience in:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« I want to recall a night at Villa Grimaldi. »
[...]
« In spite of the terror I felt, I decided that my little act of rebellion would be not to sing, not to release my voice. Besides, I thought I really wasn’t able to. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Music piece by:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
María Fedora Peña
Experience in:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« 'Look here, Maria Fedora. I’ve brought you a treasure', it was the voice of my brother Juan Cristián as he crossed the doorway of our mother’s house one morning in January 1983. »
[...]
« Personally, I have cried for him, and I still cry for him as I did as a little girl, because I was a child when horror struck me yet I wasn’t allowed to cry. »
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Errant Wind (Viento errante)

Music piece by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Testimony by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Experience in:
« Finally, in the Chacabuco Concentration Camp, after three days aboard the Policarpo Toro (a war ship which had an uncertain destination since sailing from Valparaíso in December 1973; the question was not when and where we would dock, but how we would fall overboard), I felt that death had decided to take a step back and watch from me from a little further away. »
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After the War (Después de la guerra)

Music piece by:
Sandro
Testimony by:
Nelly Andrade Alcaino
« The military officials in charge of the Tejas Verdes camp made us sing. They gave us just one day to select the songs and rehearse. »
[...]
« There were 15 women in our room. We began proposing songs. One person tried to invent a song that included a line that went something like: “my little bright-eyed lieutenant”, which the rest of the group vetoed. »
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Morning Has Broken

Music piece by:
Cat Stevens, based on a traditional Gaelic hymn; lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« At the time of the coup in 1973, this song was world-famous and frequently played on the radio. »
[...]
« This and other songs became little oases of sanity in the midst of the criminal madness that ruled over us. »
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Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Music piece by:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Experience in:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia, my sister Alejandra and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« Thus, the granddaughter and the great-granddaughter of ‘El Negro Ruiz’ sing together 'Let's break the morning with our heart...', and little by little they become acquainted with a story that they will undoubtedly teach to the future members of the family. »
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King Ñaca Ñaca (El rey Ñaca Ñaca)

Music piece by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« 'Ñaca-ñaca' was an interjection we used at Camp Melinka whenever we wanted to signal and poke fun at any dark thought that might cross our minds. That may be why it seemed the ideal name to give to the paper maché puppet that played the role of the mean king in the puppet stories we performed to entertain the children who came to visit their captive fathers. »
[...]
« Ñaca-Ñaca  - the puppet - in his role as mean king, was certainly a third-class king, a dictator who enjoyed ridiculing his prisoners. These were none other than Cinturón de Lana(Woolen Belt), Anillo de Metal(Metal Ring), Huesito (Little Bone) and Caballito de Mar (Seahorse). These were all allegorical figures that had great meaning for us as prime examples of the handicraft that came from the hands of our fellow prisoners. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Music piece by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
« Once upon a time, there was a good little wolf. … No. That’s another story. »
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