881 results where found for «The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)»


Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Song by:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Experience in:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia, my sister Alejandra and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« We would sing right up until reaching the entrance of the place where the prisoners were held. The place I most remember is the Cochrane Navy barracks located by the Los Ciervos river. »
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Far Away (Tamo daleko)

Song by:
Djordje Marinkovic. Chilean adaptation of traditional Serbian song, originally composed in 1916.
Testimony by:
Jorge Grez Leuquén
« Working as a documentary film-maker for some years, I recorded the stories of some of the prisoners during the dictatorship. It was during some of these sessions that the song 'Tamo Daleko' reappeared; it had been sung numerous times on Dawson Island. This is a humble contribution from the south of the south. »
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Captain, our Destiny is a Wandering Island (Capitán, el rumbo es una isla errante)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song was dedicated to Óscar Castro, whom I was lucky enough to meet in 1975, in Puchuncaví. With his experience in theatre – Óscar was already a fairly well-known actor before his arrest – he threw himself into the cultural work we had organised, in what was then called “Camp Melinka” where the prisoners presented a show every Friday. »
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Barlovento

Song by:
Eduardo Serrano
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« This is one of the songs the band Los de Chacabuco arranged and performed at the weekly show authorised by the military. »
[...]
« The shows were held in a large compound (which could hold over 1,000 people) that was prepared by the prisoners themselves. A stage had been built at a height enabling a good view of the artists. »
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Chacabuco Mass (Misa chacabucana)

Song by:
Ángel Parra and Ariel Ramírez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« This song is the second track on the cassette recorded in the Chacabuco prison camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, formed by Ángel Parra and led by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had already been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group's conductor. »
[...]
« These songs, as well as those from the Gospel of St Luke and the St John Passion, were performed by Los de Chacabuco in the masses celebrated by the chaplains for the benefit of the prisoners and the military. »
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Lili Marlene

Song by:
Hans Leip
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
Experience in:
« During the daily flag-lowering ritual in the camp Melinka, the prisoners first had to get into formation in the courtyard and then walk in line to the location of the mast. »
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Run Run Went up North (Run Run se fue pa'l norte)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Ernesto Parra Navarrete
Experience in:
« Run Run ... On the big pitch, mild summer weather was in the air. But for us, aching from the torture, hungry, haggard, stinking, tattered, tired of our uncertain future, all we longed for was a breath of energy that would allow us to feel that we were still alive and that the feelings of our absent loving partners were present. »
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Return, Return, Return (Volver, volver, volver)

Song by:
Vicente Fernández
Testimony by:
Jorge Montealegre Iturra
« At the Chacabucan artistic shows, Hugo Peñaloza sang tangos, including “Volver” (Return) by Gardel and Le Pera. This caused a lot of self-ironic laughter when he sang  “que veinte años no es nada” (twenty years is nothing) given our situation of uncertainty in which no one knew how long we’d be imprisoned. He also sang it during a farewell party for a group of comrades who were going to be released. To think of returning was tragicomic. And yet, four decades later, we returned. Of our own free will. »
[...]
« Back then, when he performed on the prison camp stage, he sang it mischievously and a sense of dark humour. This was expressed not only because of the real possibility of returning to the prison, but also by the gestures he made when singing “Voy camino a la locura y aunque todo me tortura…” (I’m on the road to madness and still everything tortures me...). »
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Song of a Middle-Class Man (Canción de un hombre medio)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« In our political discussions, we always spoke disdainfully of the middle class. In the view of the Marxist ideologues in prison, that sector of society supported the dictatorship and it was necessary to reverse that trend. »
[...]
« The daily regime at Valparaíso Jail obliged you to spend most of the day locked in your cell. If I was lucky to have a guitar to keep me company, I could transform that reclusion into fleeting freedom that lasted until the prison guard opened the latch the next morning. Something of the sort must have happened the night I wrote this song. »
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Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. »
[...]
« In November 1974 - I do not know the exact date - Cecilia and Flavio were taken from Cuatro Álamos and to this day, the two of them, along with the unborn baby, are still missing. »
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