444 results where found for «The Rain is Falling»


Filistoque's Cueca (Cueca del Filistoque)

Author:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida (lyrics), Efraín Navarro (music)
Testimony by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida
Place & date:
« Filistoque is a real-life person in all his mighty height (1.90 metres tall). I always remember him laughing. In Chacabuco, we shared a house for nearly ten months. Around him, you were never allowed to become depressed or get into a stew over our situation. »
[...]
« He radiated happiness and optimism. And even though he was aware that the issue would continue to trouble us, he never stopped talking about the commissions and prosecutors who would be processing our cases. He projected this optimism even beyond the prison camp fences. »
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The Little Cigarette (El cigarrito)

Author:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« During Christmas 1973, I was one of some 600 men and 100 women prisoners in Concepción Regional Stadium. The concentration camp officials allowed us to celebrate Christmas in the sports arena. To be precise, we were in one corner of the playing field and we used the pole vault pit as a stage. »
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I’m Not from Here - To my Comrade, my Love (No soy de aquí - A mi compañera)

Author:
Facundo Cabral, with lyrics modified by a political prisoner
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« The choir of male prisoners sang a piece called “A mi compañera” (To my comrade, my love) to the music of “No soy de aquí, ni soy de allá” (I'm not from here, nor from there) by Facundo Cabral. I don’t remember who wrote the lyrics. But that’s how I wrote it down in one of the ten notebooks I used to copy songs during my imprisonment. »
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Lucky Devil (El suertúo)

Author:
Víctor Canto and Luis Cifuentes (lyrics), Roberto Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This cueca* was composed at Chacabuco some time between November 1973 and February 1974, and was sung by Los de Chacabuco, of which Víctor Canto and I were members. »
[...]
« This song was written very quickly and was ready in less than a day. I don’t remember exactly where we were when we composed it, but it may have been the house I shared with other comrades or the house where the group rehearsed - located in what we called 'the civic district' - or seated at the group tables where we ate. »
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A Cocky Fellow (El puntúo)

Author:
Víctor Canto and Luis Cifuentes (lyrics), Roberto Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This cueca* was composed in Chacabuco between November 1973 and February 1974, and was sung by the band Los de Chacabuco, to which Víctor Canto and I belonged. »
[...]
« This cueca was secretly recorded in Chacabuco by Alberto Corvalán Castillo, son of the Communist Party's secretary general Luis Corvalán, with help from Guillermo Orrego and Domingo Chávez. Alberto died in Bulgaria from permanent heart damage caused by torture suffered at the National Stadium velodrome. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Author:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
María Fedora Peña
Place & date:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« “Look here, Maria Fedora. I’ve brought you a treasure...” - it was the voice of my brother Juan Cristián as he crossed the doorway of our mother’s house one morning in January 1983. Peering over the staircase banister, I saw him raise his right hand with something clenched inside. He was just back from a quick trip to La Serena, and I was spending my holidays in Chile. I had travelled home to show the family my beautiful baby girl, María Paz, my first child born in Caracas. »
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How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos)

Author:
Unknown. Popularised by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
« During the 1960s the band Quilapayún popularised this old Spanish song in Chile. Víctor Canto and I performed it as a duet in Santiago’s National Stadium - which had been converted into a concentration, torture and extermination camp - from September to November 1973. Whenever the military allowed us to do so, we would sing it in the locker rooms where we slept, and in the grandstands where we spent much of the day. »
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I Can Trust the Lord (Puedo confiar en el Señor)

Author:
Unknown
Testimony by:
Sigifredo Ramos Vásquez
Place & date:
Cárcel de Temuco, September - December 1973
« My experience during our captivity can be summed up in this personal observation. Protest songs were forbidden, so we had no other option than to sing religious songs. One religious song really struck a chord among my fellow prisoners, to such an extent that it took on the character of a true battle anthem. We sang it with such fervour that it became a genuine message of faith and hope for the much yearned-for freedom and justice. »
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Answer Me

Author:
Gerhard Winkler and Fred Rauch. English lyrics by Carl Sigman. Recorded by Frankie Laine.
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
« I sang this song alone in the National Stadium dressing rooms where I was held from September to November of 1973. This happened when the soldiers allowed artistic performances to take place in the converted dressing rooms while we waited our turn to be interrogated or after returning from interrogations. These were often torture sessions. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Author:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Luis Madariaga
Place & date:
« In prison we would sing this when a comrade was released or sent to exile. It was a powerful source of strength, solidarity and ironclad brotherhood, created during those long months in captivity, seeking an outlet for our hearts. I believe that that experience left a mark on all of us. »
[...]
« During my time at Valparaíso Prison, I had the chance to see the singer Julio Iglesias come to the facility. He said something stupid: “I am a prisoner too; I practically live on an aeroplane.” The reaction of the political prisoners watching from the third gallery of that hellish prison was total silence. The word had spread asking that no one should applaud whatever Iglesias had to say. This led Iglesias to later ask the man who had brought him to this place who those guys were up on the Prison’s third gallery, who never once applauded him and kept quiet. This had been quite noticeable because there were many of us up there surrounding the gallery's handrails. It was our way of expressing our disapproval for this man who was on good terms with Chile’s criminal dictatorship. Then Iglesias left. »
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