153 results where found for «The Vargas War»


Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Experience in:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
[...]
« The thirteen of us who remained in prison put on the blue trousers and sweatshirts the Red Cross had brought us, courtesy of the USSR. We stood in the barracks yard and began to sing in unison. We sang the “Ode to Joy” and another song of which I remember just one verse: “se va, se va, se va hacia la libertad” (going away, going away, going away towards freedom)*. The departing comrades were moved to tears, but they had to go. We kept singing to accompany them with our voices as they regained their freedom. »
[Read full testimony]

Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Song by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Experience in:
« Preparations for that Wednesday night became more intense. It would be a different night. We women prisoners had secretly organised ourselves, but more importantly, we had also coordinated with the male prisoners. I’m not sure whether it was our idea or whether the men had proposed it. That detail is irrelevant now. »
[...]
« In that spirit, we feverishly took the tables out into the middle of the prison yard and placed the benches together. Amidst all the preparations, midnight was upon us. Five minutes to midnight, in silence and in the dark, we climbed up onto the benches and the tables, as quiet as we could but smiling. That warm night, the director counted to four and then, all of a sudden, we burst into song in unison. »
[Read full testimony]

Captive Quena (Quena cautiva)

Song by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo (aka Quique Cruz)
Testimony by:
Claudio Enrique Durán Pardo
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, September - December 1975
« I first laid my hands on a quena (Andean flute) when I was nine years old. It was resplendently fragile and lyrical. My passion for this instrument was immediate, or rather, the quena chose me. Five years later, aged 14, I had already become the quena player of a quartet in ​​San Antonio. »
[...]
« It was already late spring in Santiago and the dry, translucent, warm air made the melodies travel far beyond "Pavilion A" without me noticing. I don’t know how the message reached me from the Women’s Pavilion, which was considerably removed from where I was. The message more or less said the following: "Tell the man who’s playing the quena, which from here can be heard clearly. . . to continue playing". »
[Read full testimony]

Errant Wind (Viento errante)

Song by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Testimony by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Experience in:
« Finally, in the Chacabuco Concentration Camp, after three days aboard the "Policarpo Toro" (a war ship which had an uncertain destination since sailing from Valparaíso in December 1973; the question was not when and where we would dock, but how we would fall overboard), I felt that death had decided to take a step back and watch from me from a little further away... »
[Read full testimony]

South-Eastern Storm (La Sudestada)

Song by:
unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Experience in:
« While I was in solitary confinement in Cuatro Álamos, one day I noticed there was a large room at the end of the corridor, which, overnight, the "dinos" (members of the DINA secret police) had filled with prisoners. At the end of the day, these comrades organised quite a "jamboree": talking, sharing information, asking questions and singing. It was a frenetic activity of solidarity, support, courage and warmth. »
[Read full testimony]

Casida of the Dark Pigeons (Casida de las palomas oscuras)

Song by:
Federico García Lorca (words), Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Experience in:
« According to scientists, memory and music processing are situated in a deep, ancestral part of the brain, where it is zealously guarded. Perhaps this explains why even after our bodies have been destroyed down to the bone marrow, when nothing is left of us but the murky eyes of death, music and song appear. »
[...]
« They precipitate towards our vocal cords, our tongue and our lips. It rushes forth like a cascade of near impossible notes, rapidly, before it all ends. »
[Read full testimony]

We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Song by:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Experience in:
« The parish priest at Buen Pastor played the accordion. He played so beautifully. Because I played the piano, I asked him if I could borrow it. “I’ll lend it to you” he said. Discreetly I began to learn “Venceremos”, “La Internacional”, the National Anthem and the Anthem of the Police. They made us all learn the Anthem of the Police and I knew it from my dad, who was an officer. »
[...]
« While we sang, the policemen began walking towards the prison. They had surely decided to reprimand us or something worse. I quickly started playing the first chords of the National Anthem. We were singing loudly “How pure, Chile, is your blue sky”. We sang with force and courage. When they heard the National Anthem, the policemen stopped, stood to attention and stayed still in the middle of the court. They had to wait until we finished the anthem. We sang with rage: “and a refuge from oppression”. We then sang the Anthem of the Police: “Order and Fatherland is our motto…” The policemen looked at each and burst out laughing. They went back while we carried on singing, overcome with laughter. We hugged each other laughing, feeling relieved. We then went to have a nice cup of tea with crustless bread, convinced that music is also a factor of unity, peace and love. »
[Read full testimony]

Words for Julia (Palabras para Julia)

Song by:
José Agustín Goytisolo (lyrics) and Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, 1975 and 1976 until Tres Álamos was closed on 28 November 1976
« There were so many of us women prisoners. Despite the circumstances we had managed to invent our own world, one with our rules, according to what we thought and wanted for ourselves, our families and all the Chilean people. One might think we were ambitious women, and yes, we certainly were. Most of us remain so, and surely will continue to be until the end. »
[...]
« They had been made by women who were political prisoners, they would say to each other; they knew our names, knew of our struggle, our resistance against torture, and could not believe that from those confines we had succeeded in conveying our joy of life, to move forward, to silently shout here we are, and we’re still here. And so they bought our goods, for themselves, to give to their daughters, friends and mothers. »
[Read full testimony]

You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Song by:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Experience in:
« The sound of the sea was carried over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp by the wind. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of us did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« When the day arrived, before the audience, this music sounded innovative. When we finished our turn on stage, there was a massive applause and the jury decided that 'Se escucha muy lejos' should be the winner of the prize in the International Category. I can't quite remember - was it perhaps Luis Corvalán? At any rate, one of the miscreants, as we called the 'UP hierarchy' (Unidad Popular, that is, People's Unity), who were separated from us in the concentration camp but were allowed to take part in the cultural activities, was the person who presented us with the award: a medal made from a coin and displaying a seagull, Ritoque's Seagull. »
[Read full testimony]

Valparaíso

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« This song was written and sung in cell number 198 of Valparaíso’s former prison, that is to say, on the top floor of the main building, which was higher than the walls that surrounded it. This had several advantages for the prisoner, for if they perched on a stool to peer through the skylight, they could enjoy the company of a good part of the city during their hours of confinement. »
[...]
« From that cell, he pointed out places whose names had already reached my ears via the mouths of poets and singers: Cerro Barón, Cerro Mariposa, Caleta Portales. He guided my gaze to the distant Miraflores Alto hill, located in the neighbouring city of Viña del Mar, from whence Graciela Navarro would come to visit me with her warm gaiety, helping me to get through those times of hardship with joy and hope. »
[Read full testimony]