374 results where found for «To Be Seventeen Again»


An Old Love Tune (Tonada del viejo amor)

Author:
Eduardo Falú and Jaime Dávalos
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« The Los de Chacabuco band, created and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this zamba* by Eduardo Falú and Jaime Davalos at the camp’s weekly shows. »
[...]
« I would like to see you again »
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Return, Return, Return (Volver, volver, volver)

Author:
Vicente Fernández
Testimony by:
Jorge Montealegre Iturra
« At the Chacabucan artistic shows, Hugo Peñaloza sang tangos, including “Volver” (Return) by Gardel and Le Pera. This caused a lot of self-ironic laughter when he sang  “que veinte años no es nada” (twenty years is nothing) given our situation of uncertainty in which no one knew how long we’d be imprisoned. He also sang it during a farewell party for a group of comrades who were going to be released. To think of returning was tragicomic. And yet, four decades later, we returned. Of our own free will. »
[...]
« to your arms again, »
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Lili Marlene

Author:
Hans Leip
Testimony by:
Rogelio Felipe Castillo Acevedo
« We were forced to belt out these marching songs. There was a comrade who had a limp and wore a platform shoe. When we marched his limp would throw us out of step, and then the marines would give us a good kicking. When they realised what was causing our lack of coordination, they left that comrade out of the marches. »
[...]
« We're going to meet there again »
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With the Sprouts I Sowed (Y con brotes de mi siembra)

Author:
Andrés Rivanera (lyrics) and Eugenio Moglia (music). Popularized by Los Moros and Jorge Yáñez.
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« In Chacabuco there were two theatres: one that was very beautiful and was linked to the old saltpetre works, where it is claimed (wrongly as it happens) that Caruso once performed; and another theatre that was inside the concentration camp. At the latter venue, every Sunday night at about 8 o’clock, a show was performed with the sole participation of the political prisoners and in the presence of the camp’s guards, and at the express invitation of the Council of Elders, a body that represented the comrades in captivity. »
[...]
« to dance cueca again? »
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After the War (Después de la guerra)

Author:
Sandro
Testimony by:
Nelly Andrade Alcaino
« The military officials in charge of the Tejas Verdes camp made us sing, and they gave us just one day to select the songs and rehearse. »
[...]
« That today I hear once again: »
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For the Guy Who's Leaving

Author:
Alfredo Zitarrosa
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – April 1974
« Marcelo Concha Bascuñán, member of the Los de Chacabuco band, was a young man of great charisma and personal skills. He had been a swimming champion, and was an outstanding guitarist and singer. »
[...]
« In the Chacabuco concentration camp he was renowned for his charm, excellent mood and spirit of collaboration. He taught songs to many of his colleagues, including myself, although I should note that I could never pluck the guitar as well as him. Marcelo was released from Chacabuco in April 1974. Later he was arrested again, and he is missing to this date. »
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Alfonsina and the Sea (Alfonsina y el mar)

Author:
Félix Luna (lyrics) and Ariel Ramírez (music). Popularised by Mercedes Sosa.
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
Villa Grimaldi, January 1975
« It was not easy to endure being locked up in one of Villa Grimaldi’s miserable cells that resembled vertical coffins. It was even harderin the high temperatures of the summer months of the Andes foothills in Peñalolén. I was inside one of those cells, blindfolded, my feet and hands in chains. »
[...]
« All of a sudden, I heard the metal gate that separated us from the rest of the facility unexpectedly open and the guard asking who was singing. To avoid collective punishment, I knocked on the door from inside my “coffin cell” and identified myself as the singer. The guard, who I could not see, opened the cell door and stood in front of me. “Nice song,” he said. “Sing it again.” »
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Sinner, come to sweet Jesus (Pecador, ven al dulce Jesús)

Author:
Unknown
Testimony by:
anónimo
Place & date:
« One time a group of male and female evangelicals came to Teja Island to preach. They were taken to the visitors’ yard. Because we prisoners had nothing else to do, we went to see them. »
[...]
« Something very funny happened that stayed with me for the rest of my life. After the music finished one of the evangelicals asked: “who wants to receive Jesus Christ as their saviour?” One prisoner replied: “but what if they put us in prison again?” We all burst out laughing. You had to find a way to let off steam. »
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Balderrama

Author:
Manuel José Castilla (lyrics) and Gustavo Leguizamón (music). Popularised by Mercedes Sosa
Testimony by:
Eduardo Ojeda
« We arrived at Camp Compingin on Dawson Island on the afternoon of 11 September. We knew that we had been arrested that morning, and we knew nothing else yet. The next day, another group of prisoners arrived.They told us that Salvador Allende had died. We paid tribute to him around a bonfire. It was deeply meaningful. »
[...]
« We were taken for forced labour to build Río Chico, the other detention camp on Dawson Island. José sang “Balderrama” over and over again. It has the verse “where will we end up if Balderrama is shut down”. This was the truth, because none of us knew where we would end up. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Author:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Luis Madariaga
Place & date:
« In prison we would sing this when a comrade was released or sent to exile. It was a powerful source of strength, solidarity and ironclad brotherhood, created during those long months in captivity, seeking an outlet for our hearts. I believe that that experience left a mark on all of us. »
[...]
« will once again be brothers. »
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