179 results where found for «Today I Sing Just for the Sake of Singing»


Las mañanitas

Song by:
Manuel M. Ponce
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, December 1974 - May 1976
« Normally we would sing when they locked us up in the barracks, from seven or eight at night until eight or nine in the morning. Sometimes the guards would come in but didn’t stay. It was our act. »
[...]
« I didn’t experience it as someone who joins a choir, but as a space for encounters, dialogue and de-stressing, as a chance to say something that would be heard. Once I met someone who lived a block away from Tres Álamos and said that she could hear us. For me it was never “right, let’s go to the singing workshop”. »
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Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Song by:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Experience in:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia Ovando, my sister Alejandra Ruiz and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« One song became the most special, as it had been written by one of the prisoners (at that time we didn’t know who). My dad told us that as they could not sing songs like the ones we sang in the car, a comrade had created 'Let’s Break the Morning' and that they would sing it as they went out to do various jobs in the forest. I remember that I imagined them singing with a tree trunk on their shoulders. »
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Ode to Joy (Himno a la alegría)

Song by:
original by Friedrich von Schiller (lyrics) and Ludwig van Beethoven (music). Free version in Spanish by Amado Regueiro Rodríguez, aka Orbe (lyrics) y Waldo de los Ríos (music), popularised in Chile by Miguel Ríos.
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado Vidal
« Once upon a time there was a good little wolf. … No. That’s another story. »
[...]
« And of course I listened to it, and I sang it. I am a dreadful singer. Once, at Puchuncaví concentration camp, they noticed that out of 320 singers I was the one singing the National Anthem out of tune. But at this moment I sang, I joined my comrades’ chorus with all my might, and I sang, I sang away all my joy at staying alive and still being on my feet. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
« We were in Pavilion 1. One of us came up with the idea, I can’t remember who. There were so many of us and we spent the day inventing and creating things! »
[...]
« Then we see the guys running out with tables, benches, seats, and sitting down to see us play. They tuned charangos, drums and guitars and began singing, singing to us at the top of their voices. Over a hundred prisoners singing in unison. It was stirring. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Song by:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
Eliseo González
Experience in:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« Jorge Peña Hen was in solitary confinement that day. I don’t know how, but someone brought him matches. With his saliva, he made ink from the phosphorus tips, which he then used to write a score of music on a scrap of paper. »
[...]
« They had been arrested while posing for photos for the cover of their new record. The place where they were arrested was adjacent to the petroleum tanks in the port district, near the ships in Guayacán or La Herradura Bay. »
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You Will Pay (The Cigarette Smoke) (Pagarás [El humo del cigarrillo])

Song by:
Manuel Mantilla
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Experience in:
« The political prisoners were isolated but when they made us go down to the courtyard, we were with the common prisoners. They listened to the song ‘El humo del cigarillo’ on the radio. That is the first song I remember from the period during which I was imprisoned. »
[...]
« For the political prisoners, singing allowed us to harbour hope and a sense of fraternity between us, and many more things. It was our lifeline, our refuge. It seems that singing is something intrinsically human. »
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Today Was Visitors’ Day (Hoy fue día de visitas)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
« Visitors’ day was an exceptional day that broke the monotonous routine of all the other days of the week. I wrote this song in Valparaíso Jail, where I sang it countless times accompanied by my dearly remembered cellmate, the musician Antonio Suzarte from Valparaíso. »
[...]
« Today in the shadow of the wall »
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The Brief Space Where You Are Absent (El breve espacio en que no estás)

Song by:
Pablo Milanés
Testimony by:
Vilma Rojas Toledo
Experience in:
Cárcel de Coronel, 1986 - 1988
« I recall that during my time as a political prisoner Pablo Milanés was one of our greatest companions. His songs filled us with life, helped us to keep breathing and living behind the bars imposed by Pinochet’s military dictatorship. Personally, I remember the song “El breve espacio en que no estás” (“The brief space where you are absent”) because it sparked such heated debate among my comrades that you would think we were trying to resolve a vital political issue. »
[...]
« Today I can remember it and speak about it. I can say that when I hear his songs I am immediately transported back to those years in jail in the city of Coronel, to that woman who is a political prisoner of Pinochet’s dictatorship. I remember him as the great comrade he was, through his music and his songs. »
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After the War (Después de la guerra)

Song by:
Sandro
Testimony by:
Nelly Andrade Alcaino
« The military officials in charge of the Tejas Verdes camp made us sing, and they gave us just one day to select the songs and rehearse. »
[...]
« meanwhile the gypsies keep singing that melody »
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National Anthem of Chile

Song by:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Boris Chornik Aberbuch
« The Puchuncaví detention camp’s daily routine included mandatory participation in the ceremonies of raising and taking down the Chilean flag on the flagpole at the entrance to the camp. »
[...]
« The process began by assembling the prisoners. On the camp’s central square, the commander and some of the soldiers would take roll call. Afterwards, we were marched to the camp entrance, singing military songs such as 'Lili Marlene' in unison (yes, indeed, the same one sung by the Nazi armies, but with the lyrics translated into Spanish). »
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