179 results where found for «Today I Sing Just for the Sake of Singing»


Reflections (Reflexiones)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Prison forced me to think quite a lot about my political past and my total commitment to an ideological cause, and its consequences. In this song (composed in the Puchuncaví Detention Camp and only sung for my friends and cellmates) I reflect on my role as a prisoner songwriter. »
[...]
« Today the man sings to the woman, »
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Three Indian Songs (Tres canciones indias)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« After our transfer from Tres Álamos to Puchuncaví in April 1975, a group of prisoners began toying with the idea of presenting a poetic-theatrical performance about the history of Latin America’s indigenous cultures and their extermination under Iberian domination. I joined the group offering my services as songwriter and performer, and was received with open arms. »
[...]
« This composition combines three indigenous songs in a single song. It came to me during the process of creating the great work, which we called “I sing to the Americas”. Only parts of the song were included in the programme that evening. »
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What Will the Holy Father Say (Qué dirá el Santo Padre)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We sang songs that were popular at the time. We’d sing "What will the Holy Father say," especially the part that says "What will the Holy Father who lives in Rome say ... they are slitting the throat of his dove..." quite often, for example when someone was taken off to Regimiento Arica, which was a torture centre. We would also sing "La golondrina" (The swallow), which was very symbolic, because even though we were imprisoned, we could "fly", our thoughts soaring beyond the prison walls... »
[...]
« To me music is everything in life; it's what gets me through each day. My mum played the piano, one of my brothers played the guitar. I don’t play any instrument, nor do I sing because I have a horrible voice. When I was studying primary education pedagogy a music teacher told me, "Cecilia, please don’t sing to the children". It is hard to conceive of a day without music. For me music is to spend all day with my headphones on, listening to different kinds of music. If I have to clean the house, I turn on the computer and search for something to listen to. It might occur to me to listen to Mercedes Sosa, or Quilapayún, or classical music, or something more cheerful. »
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Filistoque's Cueca (Cueca del Filistoque)

Song by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida (lyrics), Efraín Navarro (music)
Testimony by:
Víctor Canto Fuenzalida
Experience in:
« Filistoque is a real-life person in all his mighty height (1.90 metres tall). I always remember him laughing. In Chacabuco, we shared a house for nearly ten months. Around him, you were never allowed to become depressed or get into a stew over our situation. »
[...]
« No one could be oblivious to his presence. Just a greeting from Filistoque enlivened the streets of Chacabuco. A figure like him deserved a cueca of his own. Cheers to you, dear comrade, wherever you are. »
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The Little Fence (La rejita)

Song by:
lyrics: collective creation; music: “Jálame la pitita” by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Experience in:
« Let’s get going, would say “the lizards”, as we called the policemen because they dress all in green. I looked and looked so I wouldn’t forget anything, because I didn’t know how many years I would be locked up for. I was emotional too: one gets frightened. Against the traffic, they turn the wheel. »
[...]
« The political prisoners would sing “La Golondrina” in two voices. Valentina Gálvez would sing the solo and we would produce a kind of murmur. We entertained ourselves with this. For Christmas the nuns sent us an omelette and we sent a brick in return. You had to make a speech and sing. I sang “Alfonsina y el mar”. Just then, the representative of the International Red Cross arrived. He was blond, blue-eyed and well tanned. I had seen on him on the television when he visited Pisagua. In Buen Pastor there was a place we called “the pigsty” because the prisoners were all dirty, in their nighties or petticoats. They were all crying inconsolably. »
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Priests and Soldiers (Curas y milicos)

Song by:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« I don’t want to exaggerate but Camp Melinka became not only a factory that produced handicrafts and a performance hall but also a university. Every day there were classes to learn foreign languages, art, medicine or literature. Solar ovens were built. Talks were given on arachnology. Literacy programmes were offered. »
[...]
« Songs are good for releasing a singer from tempestuous doubts and allowing him to denounce injustice openly, with no qualms. In other words, the way things are painted when we see the world in black and white. Joking aside, the positive medicinal effect of music therapy is undeniable. Beyond the value a songwriter gives a song or that others may give, song-writing was a discovery that helped me, above all, to give meaning to my life as prisoner. »
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Three Mountaineers (Eran tres alpinos)

Song by:
Unknown. Traditional Spanish children's song
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We adapted this song and produced a play based on it. Each of us played one of the characters. We spent a lot of time on this. We performed the play to the other women prisoners in both centres within the prison: Regina Coellys and Alborada. Alborada was a section of Buen Pastor but it was not part of the prison facility. Alborada housed women political prisoners too. »
[...]
« You never lose hope when you are in prison. We knew that we would get out at some point. I think none of the women had been charged with any crime that may justify their arrest. The military coup had been a horrendous event that occurred in this country. They have no right to jail people because of their ideas, for wanting a better country, a country with more solidarity, more justice, greater hope. … In prison you do whatever you can just to survive. Under torture, under pressure, under custody, you do what you can to get out. And I believe that is what we did to try to stay afloat and stay alive. »
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Amalia Rosa

Song by:
Tino Carrasco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band founded and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this Venezuelan folk song, known as joropo*, singing it at the weekly prison camp show. I dare say it was one of the favourite songs of the audience, comprised of political prisoners. »
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Gigi the Ladies’ Man (Gigi l’amoroso)

Song by:
Jacqueline Misrahi, Lana Sebastian and Paul Sebastian. Popularised by Dalida.
Testimony by:
Eduardo René Cuevas
« This song was used while the Military Intelligence Service (SIM) subjected me to cruel torture at a clandestine torture centre in the southern Chilean city of Los Ángeles. »
[...]
« Sing Gigi, sing for them, Gigi. »
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I Can Trust the Lord (Puedo confiar en el Señor)

Song by:
Unknown
Testimony by:
Sigifredo Ramos Vásquez
Experience in:
Cárcel de Temuco, September - December 1973
« My experience during our captivity can be summed up in this personal observation. Protest songs were forbidden, so we had no other option than to sing religious songs. One religious song really struck a chord among my fellow prisoners, to such an extent that it took on the character of a true battle anthem. We sang it with such fervour that it became a genuine message of faith and hope for the much yearned-for freedom and justice. »
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