224 results where found for «You Can Blame Me»


Fifth Symphony

Song by:
Ludwig van Beethoven
Testimony by:
anónimo
Experience in:
« I like all classical music, particularly Beethoven and Mozart. I listen to it all day on Radio Esperanza, on the bus I drive. The passengers like it. »
[...]
« I think that perhaps there was a subliminal message behind the use of these works. I see it as a form of intimidation, perhaps because of the dark and dense atmosphere that this music can sometimes have. »
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Luchín

Song by:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
anónimo
Experience in:
« They said that once you got to the prison of Teja Island, you were safe. »
[...]
«  Famous musicians of the Nueva Canción movement. »
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Let’s Break the Morning (Rompamos la mañana)

Song by:
René “Popeye” Cárdenas Eugenin
Testimony by:
María Soledad Ruiz Ovando
Experience in:
« Music was very important for us (my mother Sylvia, my sister Alejandra and myself) while my dad, Daniel Ruiz Oyarzo, 'el Negro Ruiz', was imprisoned during the dictatorship, when Alejandra was seven and I was four. »
[...]
« Predictably there was much emotion: my dad couldn’t believe that we still remembered the lyrics. He said to us, 'but where did you get them from?', 'How can you remember them?' »
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They Say the Homeland Is - Soldiers

Song by:
Chicho Sánchez Ferlosio
Testimony by:
Sergio Reyes Soto
Experience in:
« This song, like so many others, was not at all “captive”. The revolutionary songs we sang behind bars imbued us with a sense of freedom. Rolando Alarcón, and later Quilapayún, introduced “Dicen que la patria es” (or “Canción de soldados”) to Chile. »
[...]
«  (1929-1973) Chilean singer-songwriter and poet of the Nueva Canción and Neofolklore movements. »
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The Rain is Falling (Scende la pioggia)

Song by:
The Turtles, with new lyrics by Gianni Morandi
Testimony by:
Eduardo René Cuevas
Experience in:
Cárcel de Los Ángeles, September 1973
« This song was a workhorse for the prisoners. Iván Moscoso sang it, accompanied by a guitar, in a powerful and defiant voice, and the most altruistic among us sung along in the presence of the gendarme guards, in a courtyard that was only for political prisoners. »
[...]
« For me, a prisoner from (the city of) Laja who walked with a cane, it represented a glimmer of hope and being able to say I am still alive, after twice being threatened with death on the very 11 September 1973. »
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Prayer So You Don

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. »
[...]
« I had spent most of my detention held by the DINA, at the house on José Domingo Cañas Street, called the Ollagüe Barracks. Then, I was held in solitary confinement at Cuatro Álamos and spent just a month in the Tres Álamos concentration camp. »
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Oh Saving Victim (O salutaris Hostia)

Song by:
text by Saint Thomas Aquinas; music by Lorenzo Perosi
Testimony by:
Roberto Navarrete
Experience in:
Cárcel de Santiago, November 1973 - April 1974
« The political prisoners’ cell block in Santiago Prison was established when they transferred many people from the National Stadium in October or November 1973. »
[...]
« I can only remember one of the pieces we sang: 'O salutaris Hostia', a religious song in several parts. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Song by:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado
« I arrived at Tres Álamos on the eve of the departure for Mexico with a large group of prisoners. The group included Dr. Ipinza, who before leaving entrusted me with the job of physician, the medicine donated by the Red Cross, and his position in the Council of Elders. »
[...]
« He had been caught in possession of a false identification card and arrested under suspicion of being a 'subversive'. Pulento knew nothing about the political prisoners’ organization, so he turned to his only friend of that group, a Mexican known as 'Toluca', who, in turn, handed the piece of paper to me. »
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What Will the Holy Father Say (Qué dirá el Santo Padre)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We sang songs that were popular at the time. We’d sing 'What will the Holy Father say', especially the part that says 'What will the Holy Father who lives in Rome say ... they are slitting the throat of his dove...' quite often, for example when someone was taken off to Regimiento Arica, which was a torture centre. »
[...]
«  (1935-2009) Argentine singer-songwriter and one of the most important figures in the Nueva Canción movement. »
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We Shall Prevail (Venceremos)

Song by:
Claudio Iturra (lyrics) and Sergio Ortega (music)
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« I was studying to be a chemistry teacher at the University of Chile in La Serena. I was 21 years old when I was arrested. I think I was picked up due to a specific fact. I was regularly sent copies of the El Rebelde newspaper by train, in order to distribute them in parts of Region IV. »
[...]
«  Famous Chilean group of the Nueva Canción movement, with strong affiliation to the Popular Unity coalition. »
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