448 results where found for «Zamba so as Not to Die»


Three Mountaineers (Eran tres alpinos)

Music piece by:
Unknown. Traditional Spanish children's song
Testimony by:
María Cecilia Marchant Rubilar
Experience in:
Cárcel de Mujeres Buen Pastor, La Serena, September 1973 - January 1974
« We adapted this song and produced a play based on it. Each of us played one of the characters. We spent a lot of time on this. »
[...]
« We performed the play to the other women prisoners in both centres within the prison: Regina Coellys and Alborada. Alborada was a section of Buen Pastor but it was not part of the prison facility. Alborada housed female political prisoners too. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Music piece by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
« We were in Pavilion 1. One of us came up with the idea, I can’t remember who. There were so many of us and we spent the day inventing and creating things! »
[...]
« I don’t think anyone remembers nowadays whether the White Doves or the Cucurrucucú Doves won. The poor ball was kicked anywhere, I don’t even know whether someone scored, who refereed, who was a forward, nothing about the game… But they sang the whole time, without rest. »
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Friend (Amiga)

Music piece by:
Miguel Bosé
Testimony by:
Carolina Videla
Experience in:
« I was 19 years old when they arrested me. I was one of the youngest political prisoners at the time in Arica. »
[...]
« His song gave me a feeling of protection, shelter, of not being alone. These are tokens of affection in such terrible times. »
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You Will Pay (The Cigarette Smoke) (Pagarás [El humo del cigarrillo])

Music piece by:
Manuel Mantilla
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Experience in:
« The political prisoners were isolated but when they made us go down to the courtyard, we were with the common prisoners. »
[...]
« Singing was important when we were in the dungeons. I sang with a comrade who was some four cells away. I do not remember what we sang because we had just been arrested. »
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I Come Back (Vuelvo)

Music piece by:
Patricio Manns (lyrics) and Horacio Salinas (music)
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Experience in:
« During our mateadas in the Prison of Santiago, we always talked about the song ‘Vuelvo’ (I Come Back). It gave you the hope of returning to the fight. The prison was only something temporary. »
[...]
« There were two comrades who were guitar soloists. They played classical music but I don’t remember what pieces they played, I am not an expert. The guards came to listen. »
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How We Resemble Each Other (En qué nos parecemos)

Music piece by:
Unknown. Popularised by Quilapayún
Testimony by:
Scarlett Mathieu
« In Cuatro Álamos, I was profoundly marked by the singing of a current detained-disappeared named Juan Chacón. He sang ‘En qué nos parecemos’, a love song from the Spanish Civil War. It remained engraved in me because that comrade disappeared from Cuatro Álamos. »
[...]
« I was very touched that someone sang with so much feeling. His voice was not broken. He managed to give light and hope to humankind despite all. »
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Moments (Los momentos)

Music piece by:
Eduardo Gatti
Testimony by:
Scarlett Mathieu
« ‘Moments’ was a song sung by the female comrades whose partners were imprisoned on the other side of Tres Álamos, or were fugitives or disappeared. We all sang it, but it was like their anthem. »
[...]
« I sang ‘La joya del Pacífico’ by Víctor Manuel Acosta with all my soul, although I did not know Valparaíso much. »
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Alfonsina and the Sea (Alfonsina y el mar)

Music piece by:
Félix Luna (lyrics) and Ariel Ramírez (music). Popularised by Mercedes Sosa.
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Experience in:
Villa Grimaldi, January 1975
« It was not easy to endure being locked up in one of Villa Grimaldi’s miserable cells, which resembled vertical coffins. It was even harder in the high temperatures of the summer months of the Andes foothills in Peñalolén. I was inside one of those cells, blindfolded, my feet and hands in chains. »
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The Scholar (El letrado)

Music piece by:
Quelentaro (Gastón and Eduardo Guzmán)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 – February 1974
« From the first time I heard it, I was impressed by the way the duo Quelentaro sang this song, which was also written by them. When I sang it, I always tried to sing it in their style. I never sang it on stage, only for myself or for small groups of friends strumming guitars together. »
[...]
« At Chacabuco, I sang it whenever I could get a guitar, which was not an easy thing because many people wanted to play the few available guitars. When I got hold of a guitar, I would play it sitting on the benches where we ate our meals and sometimes someone would come by and we’d sing it together. »
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La Adelita

Music piece by:
Unknown
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January – February 1974
« This is another song that was performed by the band Los de Chacabuco and was sung in the prisoners’ weekly show. It’s a very old Mexican song that was popular in Chile. »
[...]
« And if I happen to die in the war »
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