169 results where found for «Priests and Soldiers (Curas y milicos)»


Priests and Soldiers (Curas y milicos)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« I don’t want to exaggerate but Camp Melinka became not only a factory that produced handicrafts and a performance hall but also a university. Every day there were classes to learn foreign languages, art, medicine or literature. Solar ovens were built. Talks were given on arachnology. Literacy programmes were offered. »
[...]
« Priests and Soldiers (Curas y milicos) »
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Creole Mass – Gloria (Misa criolla - Gloria)

Author:
Ariel Ramírez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November – December 1973
« As far as I remember (and there may be other versions) the "Los de Chacabuco" band was founded by Ángel Parra in response to a request by the Army chaplain Varela, who asked for assistance for the Mass he celebrated for both prisoners and soldiers. Our first musical presentation was the Creole Mass by Ariel Ramírez. »
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The Black King (El rey negro)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« One cold winter night of 1975, the small clinic of Melinka, in the Puchuncaví Detention Camp, became the setting for a touching story. »
[...]
« A week later we held a cultural event in the dining room to celebrate the happy event occurrence. On that day I finished writing my song “The black king” and I sang it for the first time for an audience comprised of political prisoners and soldiers. »
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St John Passion (Pasión según San Juan)

Author:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This song is the third track on the cassette recorded in the Chacabuco concentration camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, formed by Ángel Parra and conducted by him until his release. This song, like the Gospel of Luke, was performed by Los de Chacabuco during the masses offered by the chaplains for the benefit of both prisoners and soldiers. The narrator, as was the case for other religious pieces, was Antonio. »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Author:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Renato Alvarado
« I arrived at Tres Álamos on the eve of the departure for Mexico of a large group of prisoners. The group included Dr. Ipinza, who before leaving entrusted me with the job of physician, the medicine donated by the Red Cross, and his position in the Council of Elders. At 28 years of age, I found this title odd but also understandable, in light of the social esteem with which all tribes regard their healers. This tale has its origins there, as does a famous doctors’ strike, but that is another story. »
[...]
« the soldiers take him away »
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The Prisoner of Til Til (El cautivo de Til Til)

Author:
Patricio Manns
Testimony by:
Fernando Aravena
Place & date:
« The political prisoners organised mate-drinking gatherings once or twice a week, during which we did poetry and sang songs, amongst them ‘El cautivo de Til Til’ by Patricio Manns, ‘Samba Landó’ and ‘Vuelvo’ by Inti-Illimani, ‘Valparaíso’ by Osvaldo ‘Gitano’ Rodríguez, and songs by Eduardo ‘Gato’ Alquinta and Silvio Rodríguez. »
[...]
« the soldiers take him away »
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National Anthem of Chile

Author:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Boris Chornik Aberbuch
« The Puchuncaví detention camp’s daily routine included mandatory participation in the ceremonies of raising and taking down the Chilean flag on the flagpole at the entrance to the camp. »
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« The process began by assembling the prisoners. On the camp’s central square, the commander and some of the soldiers would take roll call. Afterwards, we were marched to the camp entrance, singing military songs such as 'Lili Marlene' in unison (yes, indeed, the same one sung by the Nazi armies, but with the lyrics translated into Spanish). »
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A Cocky Fellow (El puntúo)

Author:
Víctor Canto and Luis Cifuentes (lyrics), Roberto Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« This cueca* was composed in Chacabuco between November 1973 and February 1974, and was sung by the band Los de Chacabuco, to which Víctor Canto and I belonged. »
[...]
« The lyrics may be difficult to understand since they partly refer to concentration camp folklore, but also because they mock the soldiers subtly enough for them not to notice. »
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Anthem of Puchuncaví (Himno de Puchuncaví)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« A few weeks before being transferred to Valparaíso Jail - where I would face a war council on account of alleged violations of the State Interior Security Law and other military regulations that existed during the state of siege - I wrote a song that I called anthem, because I wanted it to be sung as a group at the end of our cultural events on Fridays. The song was written so that every prisoner, regardless of political affiliation, could sing it. The only way to strengthen prisoners’ unity was to realise that all of us lived in the same conditions. »
[...]
« The version I recorded for the album Documento (1986) includes an instrumental introduction, inspired by the tune of an anthem sung in a concentration camp in the first years of Nazism in Germany. That song was called “Die Moorsoldaten” (“Soldiers of the mud”), which prisoners of the Burgermoor concentration camp sang during their backbreaking working days. »
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Lament for the Death of Augusto the Dog (Lamento a la muerte del perro Augusto)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Augusto the dog (not to be confused with the journalist Augusto Olivares, affectionately nicknamed "Augusto the Dog", who was murdered in the Presidential Palace on 11 September 1973), was the mascot of the political prisoners held at the Ritoque concentration camp, and accompanied his master when the military junta decided to close that prison and transfer the inmates to the neighbouring Puchuncaví concentration camp. »
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« The soldiers guarding us put up with him, although in truth they couldn’t stand the animal. They never lost an opportunity to show how much they disliked him. The situation became critical for Augusto when the soldiers realised that he had the same name as the dictator. »
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