3 results where found for «Jaime Dávalos»


An Old Love Tune (Tonada del viejo amor)

Author:
Eduardo Falú and Jaime Dávalos
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« The Los de Chacabuco band, created and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this zamba* by Eduardo Falú and Jaime Davalos at the camp’s weekly shows. »
[...]
« Eduardo Falú and Jaime Dávalos »
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The Salamander (La salamanca)

Author:
Arturo Dávalos
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
« A “salamanca” is a type of salamander that lives in caves in northern Argentina. By extension, it also represents the cave. In this song, the lyricist turns the “salamanca” into a place where a coven is held. »
[...]
« Arturo Dávalos »
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You Hear It Far Away (Se escucha muy lejos)

Author:
Collective creation
Testimony by:
Ignacio Puelma
Place & date:
« The sound of the sea was carried by the wind over the cabins of the Ritoque Prison Camp. It was the daily music given to us as gift by the ocean. Gone were the torture centres, the cruellest torments seemed distant, and that perception helped us to reconstruct ourselves. Ritoque, Puchuncaví, Tres Álamos and other mass prisoner centres were seething places of activity. Despite the shortcomings and the actual fact of being in prison, movement was gushing from everywhere: courses, crafts, sports, debates, chess, theatre, literature, songs… life was throbbing after we’d lived through the worst nightmares. To go back to them was always a possibility, so much so that some of our number did have to go back to the DINA's torture centres. »
[...]
« That month in the summer of 1975, not so far off, the Viña del Mar Song Festival was taking place. Our prison camp, resembling a coastal village, decided to follow suit. That was how the prisoners organised the Ritoque Song Festival. My family had sent me a guitar. Improvising, I came across a few chords that sounded good to me, and I used them to create a melody. It was starting material. Armando, a medical student who was a good guitarist, contributed arpeggios and musical phrases with a nod to jazz. Manuel on his recorder chipped in with an arrangement that sounded interesting. Pedro, who was very experienced in percussion on his bongo, provided the rhythm. Jaime wrote the lyrics of the song. At length, he and I produced the vocals. »
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