876 results where found for «Oratorio de Navidad según San Lucas»


Christmas Oratorio According to St. Luke (Oratorio de Navidad según San Lucas)

Author:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This is the first song on the cassette recorded at the Chacabuco camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, created by Ángel Parra and conducted by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group’s conductor. »
[...]
« Christmas Oratorio According to St. Luke (Oratorio de Navidad según San Lucas) »
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St John Passion (Pasión según San Juan)

Author:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This song is the third track on the cassette recorded in the Chacabuco concentration camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, formed by Ángel Parra and conducted by him until his release. This song, like the Gospel of Luke, was performed by Los de Chacabuco during the masses offered by the chaplains for the benefit of both prisoners and soldiers. The narrator, as was the case for other religious pieces, was Antonio. »
[...]
« St John Passion (Pasión según San Juan) »
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Recinto: Retén de Carabineros, Navidad
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Recinto: Retén de Carabineros Rapel, Navidad
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Futuristic Anthem (Himno futurista)

Author:
unknown
Testimony by:
Patricio Polanco
Place & date:
« In 1973 and 1974, Pisagua was characterised by the harsh and cruel treatment of political prisoners. Singing was mandatory for prisoners, who were guarded by Army platoons, and it was also a means to avoid beatings and collective mistreatment. »
[...]
« Students during these pleasant days »
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We Shall Overcome

Author:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« These performances were divided in two parts, each lasting around 40 minutes. In one we presented the "Cantata of Santa María de Iquique", but that's another story. With a smaller group, which we called The Hard-boiled Eggs (I still have no idea where that name came from or how we chose it), we presented a show every other Sunday at noon. There we’d accompany anyone who wanted to sing a song of their choice. But that, too, is another story. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Author:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Boris Chornik Aberbuch
« The Puchuncaví detention camp’s daily routine included mandatory participation in the ceremonies of raising and taking down the Chilean flag on the flagpole at the entrance to the camp. »
[...]
« Finally, when we were neatly assembled around the flagpole, the commander would order a soldier to slowly begin raising the flag, while all of us prisoners sang the National Anthem that included an unfamiliar stanza about the 'brave soldiers'. »
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Partisan Anthem (Himno guerrillero)

Author:
Unknown. Russian melody. During the Russian Revolution, several lyrics with different ideological content circulated. This version is based on "Makhnovtchina", attributed to Nestor Makhno, Ukrainian anarchist revolutionary.
Testimony by:
Julio Laks Feller
Place & date:
« In late September 1974, the Soviet partisan’s song was intoned softly but with an awe-inspiring force in the José Domingo Cañas torture centre. Our comrade and beloved friend Sergio Pérez Molina, leader of the MIR who had fallen into the hands of the DINA a few days earlier, was being tortured again. We had already seen him disfigured by the blows; they had even applied electricity to a bullet wound when they shot him at the time of his arrest. Moren Brito boasted that he had run a pick-up truck over Sergio’s body. »
[...]
« The Amur partisans were transformed into the partisans of "amor" (love), as rendered by the translations of that song that celebrates the courage of the guerrillas who fought on the shores of the river of the same name. Precisely that love uniting us is what gave us strength to resist. In the same way, we also sang “L'Internationale” when on 5 October Miguel's assassins returned triumphantly to the facility. »
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I Can Trust the Lord (Puedo confiar en el Señor)

Author:
Unknown
Testimony by:
Sigifredo Ramos Vásquez
Place & date:
Cárcel de Temuco, September - December 1973
« My experience during our captivity can be summed up in this personal observation. Protest songs were forbidden, so we had no other option than to sing religious songs. One religious song really struck a chord among my fellow prisoners, to such an extent that it took on the character of a true battle anthem. We sang it with such fervour that it became a genuine message of faith and hope for the much yearned-for freedom and justice. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Author:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Place & date:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
[...]
« I still remember those intense moments when we sang so many songs. Gazing up at the sky, we sang “Candombe** para José”, which we called “El Negro José”. I understood that song as something new and different from the songs we usually sang. It seemed more contemporary to me and it made me feel in touch with my people outside the camp. The line “en un pueblo olvidado no sé por qué” (“in a God-forsaken town, I don't know why”) seemed connected with how I was feeling at that time. »
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