360 results where found for «Christmas Oratorio According to St. Luke»


Christmas Oratorio According to St. Luke (Oratorio de Navidad según San Lucas)

Author:
Ángel Parra
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, January - February 1974
« This is the first song on the cassette recorded at the Chacabuco camp by the band Los de Chacabuco, created by Ángel Parra and conducted by him until his release. At the time that the cassette was recorded, Ángel had been freed and Ernesto Parra had become the group’s conductor. »
[...]
« Christmas Oratorio According to St. Luke (Oratorio de Navidad según San Lucas) »
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We Shall Overcome

Author:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« With the group we formed towards the end of 1974, we decided to perform in one of the two visitors’ courtyards at Concepción Prison that Christmas. We built a stage, we set up a PA system and the Caracol Theatre Group came to perform a short play. »
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The Soldier (El soldado)

Author:
Rafael Alberti (lyrics), Ángel Parra (music)
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« During Christmas 1973, approximately 660 men and 100 women were held as prisoners in the Concepción Regional Stadium. Concentration camp officials allowed us to celebrate Christmas on the pitch. We were in a corner of the pitch and we used the pole vault pit as a stage. Two professional radio broadcasters were excellent masters of ceremony, combining veiled messages with other more candid ones, all with a hefty dose of humour and good taste. They also recited poems. »
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The Little Cigarette (El cigarrito)

Author:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« During Christmas 1973, I was one of some 600 men and 100 women prisoners in Concepción Regional Stadium. The concentration camp officials allowed us to celebrate Christmas in the sports arena. To be precise, we were in one corner of the playing field and we used the pole vault pit as a stage. »
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The Little Fence (La rejita)

Author:
lyrics: collective creation; music: “Jálame la pitita” by Luis Abanto Morales (Peruvian polka)
Testimony by:
Lucía Chirinos
Place & date:
« Let’s get going, would say “the lizards”, as we called the policemen because they dress all in green. I looked and looked so I wouldn’t forget anything, because I didn’t know how many years I would be locked up for. I was emotional too: one gets frightened. Against the traffic, they turn the wheel. »
[...]
« The political prisoners would sing “La Golondrina” in two voices. Valentina Gálvez would sing the solo and we would produce a kind of murmur. We entertained ourselves with this. For Christmas the nuns sent us an omelette and we sent a brick in return. You had to make a speech and sing. I sang “Alfonsina y el mar”. Just then, the representative of the International Red Cross arrived. He was blond, blue-eyed and well tanned. I had seen on him on the television when he visited Pisagua. In Buen Pastor there was a place we called “the pigsty” because the prisoners were all dirty, in their nighties or petticoats. They were all crying inconsolably. »
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Free (Libre)

Author:
Nino Bravo
Testimony by:
Marianella Ubilla
« I was taken prisoner on 23 November 1973, at the University of Concepción. In the Regional Stadium of Concepción we had to sing the National Anthem every day. They’d always play military marching music. I think they did that to show that they were the bosses. »
[...]
« During the Christmas celebrations we sang Nino Bravo’s "Libre" (Free). At the same time you could hear the National Anthem. I was 18 years old at the time and thought: "What am I doing here if all I did was work for an ideal, for a more just society?". After Christmas I was taken to Fort Borgoño in Talcahuano. There I just heard screams and bayonets. »
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Three white lilies (Tres blancos lirios)

Author:
Unknown composer. This song probably relates to European early-years pedagogy.
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
Place & date:
« They arrested me at my workplace in October 1973 . I was 31 years old and worked as a porter at a logging business in Chumpullo, near Valdivia. »
[...]
« For Christmas in 1973 we sang for the relatives that came to visit us. We sang “Arrorró mi niño, “Noche de Paz”, and “Señora doña María”. »
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The Wall (La muralla)

Author:
Nicolás Guillén (lyrics) and Quilapayún (music)
Testimony by:
Domingo Lizama
« In prison, there was a guy who played the guitar. He cheered up the afternoons in the cell. We all sang with him. »
[...]
« For Christmas, we got permission for our wives and children to come visit us. We sang “Noche de Paz”, “Señora Doña María” and “Arrorró mi niño”. When our visitors brought food, we would share it with the gendarmes. They were starving. They were conscripted youngsters. »
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Melody by Jorge Peña Hen

Author:
Jorge Peña Hen
Testimony by:
Eliseo González
Place & date:
Cárcel de la Serena, October 1973
« Jorge Peña Hen was in solitary confinement that day. I don’t know how, but someone brought him matches. With his saliva, he made ink from the phosphorus tips, which he then used to write a score of music on a scrap of paper. »
[...]
« We celebrated Christmas 1973 with comrades who played the guitar and with members of a band called Toque de Queda (Curfew) who were in prison for a month. »
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Casida of the Dark Pigeons (Casida de las palomas oscuras)

Author:
Federico García Lorca (words), Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Luis Alfredo Muñoz González
Place & date:
« According to scientists, memory and music processing are situated in a deep, ancestral part of the brain, where it is zealously guarded. Perhaps this explains why even after our bodies have been destroyed down to the bone marrow, when nothing is left of us but the murky eyes of death, music and song appear. »
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