147 results where found for «From the Poplars I have Come, Mother»


From the Poplars I have Come, Mother (De los álamos vengo, madre)

Author:
Juan Vásquez
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band created and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this traditional Spanish song at the Chacabuco concentration camp. »
[...]
« From the poplars I have come, mother »
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The Black King (El rey negro)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« One cold winter night of 1975, the small clinic of Melinka, in the Puchuncaví Detention Camp, became the setting for a touching story. »
[...]
« A woman from the neighbouring village of Rungue, who was not a prisoner, gave birth to a daughter in that unusual place. Two political prisoners, both of them medical students, assisted the mother in labour while the other 208 prisoners slept in their respective cells, oblivious to what was happening. »
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We Shall Overcome

Author:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On 19 February of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« On that occasion, our newly formed band (without a name) performed the following programme: "Soy del pueblo" (I am of the People) by Carlos Puebla; "El aparecido" (The Appeared) by Víctor Jara; "Los pueblos americanos" (The American Peoples) by Violeta Parra; "Vamos a Serchil" (Let's go to Serchil) by the Guatemalan Leopoldo Ramírez; "Del Norte vengo, Maruca" (I Come from the North, Maruca) by Ángel Parra (although some people say it was written by his mother); "Villancico nortino" (Northern Christmas Carol), a traditional song; and finally 'We Shall Overcome', written between 1950 and 1960 in the United States within the context of the Afro-American civil rights movement. In the prison we were acquainted with Joan Baez's version. We sang it in English and, of course, we explained its content and meaning. »
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Tacit Song (Canción tácita)

Author:
All the women present at that moment in Chacabuco
Testimony by:
Mónica García Cuadra
Place & date:
« I am the daughter of a former political prisoner who spent a long time imprisoned at Chacabuco, among other places. I am Monica, a little 9-year-old girl who travelled with a heavy heart full of sadness to visit her father, Gerardo García Salas, held at the Chacabuco concentration camp. I am an only child and in my young life he is my sole reference point and, in essence, my image of masculinity. »
[...]
« From the guard tower, the order was given for the comrades to come, and they appeared behind the bars that separated our lives, but never our purpose and meaning in life. With heartache and streaming tears, several prisoners began to appear, as well as the love and silent solidarity that vibrated and pulsatedthrough those moments waiting for, anticipating the embrace, the looking directly into his eyes, making contact with the loved one’s heart, the touch of skin against skin among equals. »
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Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Author:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Place & date:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
[...]
« I tried to raise my voice to the infinite space way beyond the edge of the barrack roof that reminded me of my limitations. Amelia put her arm around my shoulder. I did the same to Tuca and all of us embraced each other, singing from the tabletop. We were so close together, and a sense of sisterhood enveloped us. I was not alone; I was with those women who were my sisters. We had survived so much brutality and suffering. I sang with all my might on top of the table with those dear women: Amelia, Tuca, Anita, Anita María, Elena, Gabriela, Nieves, Cristina, Fidelia, Cecilia and another friend whose name I have forgotten. »
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Today I Sing for the Sake of Singing (Hoy canto por cantar)

Author:
Nydia Caro and Riccardo Cerratto
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Place & date:
« I have never been a great music listener. Nevertheless, before the coup I used to listen to Nueva Canción, especially Quilapayún and Rolando Alarcón. I also liked cumbias, to fool around. We would dance and have fun. On the other hand, and this is more due to my family, I have always liked classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky. It stirs important things in me. It moves me. »
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« There was a lot of music at Venda, and very loud too. For me this was noise, except for one song that is engraved in my mind; it’s by Nydia Caro: "Hoy canto por cantar" (Today I sing just for the sake of singing). Why is it in my mind? Because the officers from the DINA secret police amused themselves with it. They would say to us “sing”, because singing also means grassing on someone. For me this was fresh aggression, because whenever they played this song, and they would put it on very loud, it was to pressure you to collaborate. This is the song I remember from Venda Sexy. I have listened to it a number of times since and it is the only thing I remember as music. »
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Errant Wind (Viento errante)

Author:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Testimony by:
Patricio Hermosilla Vives
Place & date:
« Finally, in the Chacabuco Concentration Camp, after three days aboard the "Policarpo Toro" (a war ship which had an uncertain destination since sailing from Valparaíso in December 1973; the question was not when and where we would dock, but how we would fall overboard), I felt that death had decided to take a step back and watch from me from a little further away... »
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« "Errant wind " (composed towards the end of that year during the improvised "literary workshop" in which Salas, Montealegre, another prisoner and myself, tried to divert the raw pain of those hours, exploring some possible forms of "existential meaning"), a song more unconscious than conscious, which attempted from its inception to idealise freedom in the shape of a woman without a defined face or name although, on the other hand, she embodied all the roles of a woman: mother, daughter, sister, girlfriend... »
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Words for Julia (Palabras para Julia)

Author:
José Agustín Goytisolo (lyrics) and Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, 1975 and 1976 until Tres Álamos was closed on 28 November 1976
« There were so many of us women prisoners. Despite the circumstances we had managed to invent our own world, one with our rules, according to what we thought and wanted for ourselves, our families and all the Chilean people. One might think we were ambitious women, and yes, we certainly were. Most of us remain so, and surely will continue to be until the end. »
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« They had been made by women who were political prisoners, they would say to each other; they knew our names, knew of our struggle, our resistance against torture, and could not believe that from those confines we had succeeded in conveying our joy of life, to move forward, to silently shout here we are, and we’re still here. And so they bought our goods, for themselves, to give to their daughters, friends and mothers. »
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National Anthem of Chile

Author:
Eusebio Lillo and Ramón Carnicer
Testimony by:
Boris Chornik Aberbuch
« The Puchuncaví detention camp’s daily routine included mandatory participation in the ceremonies of raising and taking down the Chilean flag on the flagpole at the entrance to the camp. »
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« They steadfastly joined us as we marched from the square to the flagpole, as well as during the flag-raising ceremony. But they did not always keep the composure that would have been appropriate to the ceremony’s solemnity. »
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Lament for the Death of Augusto the Dog (Lamento a la muerte del perro Augusto)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Augusto the dog (not to be confused with the journalist Augusto Olivares, affectionately nicknamed "Augusto the Dog", who was murdered in the Presidential Palace on 11 September 1973), was the mascot of the political prisoners held at the Ritoque concentration camp, and accompanied his master when the military junta decided to close that prison and transfer the inmates to the neighbouring Puchuncaví concentration camp. »
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« Nobody could stop Augusto from suffering the same fate as thousands of left-wing Chilean militants. The bullet that killed him came from the gun of a Navy officer, who hours before had assured us that nothing would happen to the dog if we stopped him crossing the fence and nosing around the Commander’s compound. All of us know that Augusto didn’t leave our side that day and we have sufficient grounds to suspect that the murderer had a political prisoner in his sights when he pulled the trigger. »
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