239 results where found for «Prayer So You Don't Forget Me»


Prayer So You Don't Forget Me

Song by:
Óscar Castro (words) and Ariel Arancibia González (music)
Testimony by:
Rosalía Martínez
Experience in:
« When Katia Chornik contacted me a few years ago asking me to provide my testimony about my musical experience in prison, I thought I didn’t have much to say. »
[...]
« Prayer So You Don't Forget Me »
[Read full testimony]

La López Pereyra

Song by:
Artidorio Cresseri
Testimony by:
Germán Larrabe
« This Argentine zamba(1) was the first song we tried to perform in Puchuncaví, with a group made up of prisoners transferred from Chacabuco Detention Camp together with us, newly arrived 'puchuncas'. »
[...]
« They've told me that you don't love me »
[Read full testimony]

Candombe for José (Candombe para José)

Song by:
Roberto Ternán
Testimony by:
Sara De Witt
Experience in:
« We were in Tres Álamos barracks in September 1976. I don’t recall how many of us women were imprisoned there. I believe there were close to a hundred of us. »
[...]
« I still remember those intense moments when we sang so many songs. Gazing up at the sky, we sang 'Candombe para José', which we called 'El Negro José'. I understood that song as something new and different from the songs we usually sang. It seemed more contemporary to me and it made me feel in touch with my people outside the camp. The line 'en un pueblo olvidado no sé por qué' ('in a God-forsaken town, I don't know why') seemed connected with how I was feeling at that time. »
[Read full testimony]

Neither Fish nor Fowl (Ni chicha ni limoná)

Song by:
Víctor Jara
Testimony by:
Joaquín Vallejos
Experience in:
« I was arrested at home together with a childhood friend who they’d gone to pick up first. My family thought he’d stitched me up, which was not true. »
[...]
« There I could hear the women held in the cell in front of ours (they were almost certainly much worse off than we were), singing a song that has stuck in my mind ever since. It was the one that says 'Usted no es ná, no es chicha ni limoná' (You’re nothing, you're neither fish nor fowl). This example of fortitude and commitment helped me to get back on my feet, forget the physical pain and try to help those comrades who were worse off than me. »
[Read full testimony]

To Be Seventeen Again (Volver a los diecisiete)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Gabriela Durand
« I was 18, and already I had been tortured on the rack several times. One day I was with some other comrade prisoners, and as sometimes happened, the guards put some music on. They used to put the radio on, playing popular tunes of the time. For us young people, the songs were a bit corny, but still we enjoyed them; they were a relief. We always kept absolute silence. »
[...]
« And the fact that they should choose precisely that song, 'To Be Seventeen Again' was like going back to the time of the Popular Unity government. They did it to traumatise you. But they didn't succeed that much, because when I sang I felt that tremor, that humiliation, but I also thought about him, Carlos, and suddenly I even managed to forget that I was singing because I had been ordered to; I even felt inspired for a moment. »
[Read full testimony]

The Letter (La carta)

Song by:
Violeta Parra
Testimony by:
Paicavi Painemal
Experience in:
« We set up a band with a group of fellow prisoners. They were young, university students. One of them had a guitar. »
[...]
« Sometimes evangelicals would come to say a prayer and sing traditional songs. That never appealed to me. »
[Read full testimony]

Zamba so as Not to Die (Zamba para no morir)

Song by:
Hamlet Lima Quintana
Testimony by:
Ana María Jiménez
Experience in:
Villa Grimaldi, April 1975
« I want to recall a night at Villa Grimaldi. »
[...]
« “We're bored here. So you’re gonna sing something to entertain us.” »
[Read full testimony]

Blue Eyes (Ojos azules)

Song by:
Manuel Casazola Huancco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Experience in:
« This is the last track on the cassette recorded by the band Los de Chacabuco in the concentration camp; it was digitised in 2015. »
[...]
« poison to forget you. »
[Read full testimony]

After the War (Después de la guerra)

Song by:
Sandro
Testimony by:
Nelly Andrade Alcaino
« The military officials in charge of the Tejas Verdes camp made us sing. They gave us just one day to select the songs and rehearse. »
[...]
« because this song helps me forget. »
[Read full testimony]

The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Song by:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by the band Amerindios
Testimony by:
Carlos Muñoz
Experience in:
« One of the most important songs in the detention centres. Impossible to count how many times we sang it. Every time someone was released from a detention camp or there was credible information that a person would be sent into exile, a gigantic chorus would sing this song, in a powerful unison. No one could possibly forget it. Especially significant at Tres Álamos, as this was the “exit” camp. »
[Read full testimony]