382 results where found for «Que la tortilla se vuelva»


Amalia Rosa

Author:
Tino Carrasco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band founded and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this Venezuelan folk song, known as joropo*, singing it at the weekly prison camp show. I dare say it was one of the favourite songs of the audience, comprised of political prisoners. »
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Words for Julia (Palabras para Julia)

Author:
José Agustín Goytisolo (lyrics) and Paco Ibáñez (music)
Testimony by:
Amelia Negrón
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, 1975 and 1976 until Tres Álamos was closed on 28 November 1976
« There were so many of us women prisoners. Despite the circumstances we had managed to invent our own world, one with our rules, according to what we thought and wanted for ourselves, our families and all the Chilean people. One might think we were ambitious women, and yes, we certainly were. Most of us remain so, and surely will continue to be until the end. »
[...]
« 1975 and 1976 until Tres Álamos was closed on 28 November 1976 »
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Zamba of my Hope (Zamba de mi esperanza)

Author:
Luis H. Profili
Testimony by:
Edgardo Carabantes Olivares
« Horacio Carabantes Olivares, my brother, was locked up in January 1975 at the Maipo regiment of Valparaíso, with a large group of male and female prisoners, all arrested by the DINA. »
[...]
« A month later, on 20 February 1975, Horacio along with other inmates – male and female – disappeared from Villa Grimaldi, in Santiago, after being passed around different clandestine detention centres. He had recently turned 22 years old. »
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Las mañanitas

Author:
Manuel M. Ponce
Testimony by:
Beatriz Bataszew Contreras
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros, Tres Álamos, December 1974 - May 1976
« Normally we would sing when they locked us up in the barracks, from seven or eight at night until eight or nine in the morning. Sometimes the guards would come in but didn’t stay. It was our act. »
[...]
« To every comrade who had a birthday, before going out to formation, we would sing "Las mañanitas" and we would give them presents. The majority of the female prisoners would come together and sing to you. I spent one birthday in prison. Birthdays were important for everyone because we were alive. Because you have a birthday when you’re alive. »
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With the Sprouts I Sowed (Y con brotes de mi siembra)

Author:
Andrés Rivanera (lyrics) and Eugenio Moglia (music). Popularized by Los Moros and Jorge Yáñez.
Testimony by:
Guillermo Orrego Valdebenito
« In Chacabuco there were two theatres: one that was very beautiful and was linked to the old saltpetre works, where it is claimed (wrongly as it happens) that Caruso once performed; and another theatre that was inside the concentration camp. At the latter venue, every Sunday night at about 8 o’clock, a show was performed with the sole participation of the political prisoners and in the presence of the camp’s guards, and at the express invitation of the Council of Elders, a body that represented the comrades in captivity. »
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Anthem of Puchuncaví (Himno de Puchuncaví)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« A few weeks before being transferred to Valparaíso Jail - where I would face a war council on account of alleged violations of the State Interior Security Law and other military regulations that existed during the state of siege - I wrote a song that I called anthem, because I wanted it to be sung as a group at the end of our cultural events on Fridays. The song was written so that every prisoner, regardless of political affiliation, could sing it. The only way to strengthen prisoners’ unity was to realise that all of us lived in the same conditions. »
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Valparaíso

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« This song was written and sung in cell number 198 of Valparaíso’s former prison, that is to say, on the top floor of the main building, which was higher than the walls that surrounded it. This had several advantages for the prisoner, for if they perched on a stool to peer through the skylight, they could enjoy the company of a good part of the city during their hours of confinement. »
[...]
« From that cell, he pointed out places whose names had already reached my ears via the mouths of poets and singers: Cerro Barón, Cerro Mariposa, Caleta Portales. He guided my gaze to the distant Miraflores Alto hill, located in the neighbouring city of Viña del Mar, from whence Graciela Navarro would come to visit me with her warm gaiety, helping me to get through those times of hardship with joy and hope. »
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How Can I Describe This to You? (Cómo hacer para darte una idea)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« This is one of two songs I wrote in prison for my beloved Graciela Navarro. In the song I tried to draw her closer to me, describing my everyday world and my experience of life as a captive. »
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Beloved Friend (Amado amigo)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song, written in my cell at the Puchuncaví Prison Camp, speaks to a friend and fellow prisoner; it could be any one of the thousands behind bars. »
[...]
« The lyrics contain metaphors that might be difficult to understand today because they constitute a cryptic language prisoners used to communicate with each other. Here are a few explanations: »
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Love Song for a Disappeared Woman (Canción de amor a una desaparecida)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« Daniela was the political codename of María Cecilia Labrín, a member of the Movement of the Revolutionary Left (MIR). Agents of the DINA (the regime’s secret police) arrested her at her home on Latadía Street in Santiago in August 1974. She has never been seen again. »
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