5 results where found for «Tino Carrasco»


Amalia Rosa

Author:
Tino Carrasco
Testimony by:
Luis Cifuentes Seves
Place & date:
Campamento de Prisioneros Chacabuco, November 1973 - February 1974
« Los de Chacabuco, a band founded and conducted by Ángel Parra, performed this Venezuelan folk song, known as joropo*, singing it at the weekly prison camp show. I dare say it was one of the favourite songs of the audience, comprised of political prisoners. »
[...]
« Tino Carrasco »
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The Paper Boat (El barco de papel)

Author:
Julio Numhauser, popularised by Amerindios.
Testimony by:
José Selín Carrasco Vargas
« While we were imprisoned in Melinka, this song was sung every time that one of us was released. I remember a fellow prisoner nicknamed Bigote Molina (Moustache Molina) singing the song when we were going to Tres Álamos, from where we would be released a few days later. »
[...]
« José Selín Carrasco Vargas »
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Poet of Destiny (Poeta del destino)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
Place & date:
« This song is a tribute to Miguel Enríquez, Secretary General of the Movement of the Revolutionary Left (MIR), who was gunned down by a commando of the dictatorship’s secret police on October 5, 1974. My own five- year militancy in that organisation resulted in my enormous respect for this individual. »
[...]
« Poet of Destiny (Poeta del destino) »
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We Shall Overcome

Author:
Attributed to Charles Albert Tindley
Testimony by:
Alfonso Padilla Silva
« When the concentration camp that operated for nearly five months at the Regional Stadium of Concepción was closed in early February 1974, hundreds of political prisoners were transferred to the Concepción Prison, a wing of which was turned into a concentration camp. On February 19 of that year, a trial process began before a military tribunal and seven or eight comrades including myself were transferred to the prison. »
[...]
« On that occasion, our newly formed band (without a name) performed the following programme: 'Soy del pueblo' (I am of the People) by Carlos Puebla; 'El aparecido' (The Apparition) by Víctor Jara; 'Los pueblos americanos' (The American Peoples) by Violeta Parra; 'Vamos a Serchil' (Let's go to Serchil) by Guatemalan Leopoldo Ramírez; 'Del Norte vengo, Maruca' (I Come from the North, Maruca) by Ángel Parra (although some people say it was written by his mother); 'Villancico nortino' (Northern Christmas Carol) a traditional song; and finally 'We Shall Overcome', created between 1950 and 1960 in the United States within the context of the Afro-American civil rights movement. In the prison we were acquainted with Joan Baez's version. We sang it in English and, of course, we explained its contents and meaning. »
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Beloved Friend (Amado amigo)

Author:
Sergio Vesely
Testimony by:
Sergio Vesely
« This song, written in my cell at the Puchuncaví Prison Camp, speaks to a friend and fellow prisoner; it could be any one of the thousands behind bars. »
[...]
« Aimless strolls (caminatas sin destino): Nothing was more characteristic of life in the detention camps and jails than people who strolled alone or with another person in the corridors, halls, prison yard or in a cell. No observer could suppress a smirk upon watching the incongruous bustle to nowhere, changing direction upon nearing a wall or a barbed wire fence. This ritual encouraged interpersonal relationships. We didn't go to the movies with a friend. Instead we would take an aimless stroll to nowhere, which was also the safest “place” for sharing information and to unleash the imagination without the risk of being overheard by some snoop. »
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